FISHWRECKAPEDIA

FISHWRECKAPEDIA - A fish identification resource for Fishwrecked.com members. 

All images (unless otherwise noted) are from the Fishwrecked.com photo galleries, contributed to by over 40,000 Fishwrecked.com members.  

Fishwrecked.com is based in Western Australia, therefore the majority of fish images are local and are described using names common to Western Australia.

 

Page 1:  Trevally, Pennant Fish, Mackerel, Emperor/Lethrinus, Lutjanus, Remora, Black Snoek, Snake Mackerel, Gemfish, Common Silverbiddy, Bream (by common name), Javelin Fish, Dolphinfish, Cobia, Rainbow Runner, Finny Scad, Morwong, Queen Snapper, Jewfish, Mulloway, Kingfish, Amberjack, Samsonfish, Tuna

Page 2:  Rockcod and Cod (by common name), Chinaman Fish, Trout (by common name), Harlequin, Herring, Threadfin, Sweetlips, Western Foxfish, Blackspot Pigfish, Black Rabbitfish, Flutemouth, Pike, Snook, Barracouta, Longtom, Flathead, Triggerfish, Queenfish, Banded Archerfish, Boarfish, Jawfish, John Dory, Trumpeter, Sergeant Baker, Gobbleguts, Scaleyfin, Fusilier, Flounder

Page 3:   Gulf Saratoga, Dart, Sand Bass, Perch, Sooty Grunter, Jobfish, Snapper (by common name), Nannygai, Swallowtail, Wrasse, Parrotfish, Tuskfish, Baldchin Groper, Barracuda, Wahoo, Bonito, Leatherjacket, Western Rock Blackfish, Hapuku, Groper, Blue-eyed Trevalla, Barramundi Cod, Breaksea Cod, Tailor, Western Butterfish, Silverspot, Boxfish, Barred Soapfish, Orange Roughy, Tripletail, Rock Ling, Giant Sea Catfish, Cobbler, Sweep, Yellow tail Scad, Whiting

Page 4:  Weeping Toadfish/Blowfish, Norwest Blowie, Gurnard, Western Fortescue, Western Red Scorpionfish, Red Lionfish, Bluespine Unicornfish, Western Blue Devilfish, Barramundi, Western Frogfish, Wirrah, Rainbow Cale, Zebrafish, Murray Cod, Dhufish, Northern Pearl Perch, White Sturgeon, Slinger Seabream, Grinner, Bonefish, Tarpon, Mullet, Batfish, Convict Surgeonfish, Western Striped Cardinalfish, Shaw's Cowfish, Stripey, Moonlighter, Slender Seamoth, Knifejaw, Scissortail Sergeant, Southern Sea Garfish, Longtom, Frostfish, Goatfish, Marlin, Shortbill Spearfish, Sailfish, Bullseye, Silver Moony, Salmon

 

 

Bibliography:  www.fish.wa.gov.auwww.australianmuseum.net.auwww.efishalbum.comwww.wikipedia.comwww.aims.gov.au, www.fishbase.org,  Australian Fish and How to Catch Them (Richard Allan ISBN 1-863026746), Field Guide to Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South East Asia (Gerald R. Allen ISBN 9781920843397), Sea Fishes of Southern Australia (Barry Hutchins, Roger Swainston ISBN 1-875169-78-4), The Marine Fishes of North-Western Australia, A Field Guide for Anglers and Divers (Gerald R. Allen, Roger Swainston ISBN 0 7309 2113 1), Grant's Fishes of Australia (E.M. Grant ISBN 0 7316 0234 X), Field Guide to Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-East Asia (Gerald R. Allen ISBN 978-1-910843-39-7).

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Big eye trevally - Caranx sexfasciatus

Sat, 2010-01-30 16:48

Big eye Trevally are identified by the gelatinous covering to the rear of the large eye.  Their bodies are elongate with a silvery blue/green back and a silver belly.  The head is moderately steep with a slightly pointed snout.  The second dorsal, anal and tail fins are blackish, the dorsal and anal with white tips.  There is a small black spot on the upper margin of the operculum.  The breast is fully scaled, the soft dorsal fin has 19-22 soft rays. 

Juveniles are silvery yellow to silvery brown with five to six vertical bands on their sides.  As they mature the bands fade.  Fins are pale grey to yellow, the anal fin is yellow/green with a white tip and the tail is yellowish with a fine dark margin. 

Big eye Trevally grow to 18kgs and 1.2 metres in length. 

The flesh is strong in taste and the fish needs to be bled on capture. 

In Australia Big eye trevally are found from the south west coast of Western Australia, north around the tropical coast, then south to the central coast of New South Wales, inhabiting reefs to depths of 100m. 

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Black Trevally - Caranx Lugubris

Sat, 2010-01-30 17:13

Black Trevally are dark grey to almost black on the back shading to bluish grey on the sides.   There is a black spot on the upper margin of the operculum.  They have a steep forehead to the eyes, long curved pectoral fins and a forked tail.  There are black scutes on the rear of the body.

Black Trevally grow to 18kgs and 1 metre in length. 

The flavour is strong and the fish needs to be bled on capture. 

In Australia they are found from NW Western Australia and from the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Longraker Trevally - Ulua mentalis

Sat, 2010-01-30 17:18

Longraker Trevally are silver with a blue-green dorsal area.  The spiny dorsal and caudal fins are dusky to black and the second dorsal and anal fins are pale green.  In large fish, there is a diffuse dark blotch high on the upper margin of the operculum.  The pronounced lower jaw protrudes beyond the upper jaw.  Longraker Trevally have long gill rakers that extend along the side of the tongue.  In young fish, the inside of the mouth is silver to white. 

Longraker Trevally grow to 1 metre in length. 

They are considered average eating, good for smoking.  They must be bled and iced immediately on capture. 

In Australia, Longraker Trevally are found from Shark Bay Western Australia around the tropical north and south to northern Queensland. 

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Diamond Trevally - Alectis indica

Sat, 2010-01-30 18:33

Often confused with the Pennantfish (Alectis ciliaris), Diamond Trevally can be distinguished by the more angular shape of the head and nape vs the more rounded head of the Pennantfish.  There is a distinct hump in the head profile above the eyes (caused by a slight concavity near the eyes) and there is a wider space between the eye and mouth of the Diamond Trevally than the Pennantfish.  Diamond Trevally are deep bodied and uniformly silver, often reflecting blue, pink and green on capture (also known as Mirror Fish).  They have a large forked tail and long curved pectoral fins. 

Juveniles have four to seven broad, darkish bands and the dorsal fin has long filaments.   There is no black blotch at the base of the filaments.

They grow to 25kgs and 1.65 metres. 

Diamond Trevally are considered poor to average eating having dark flesh.  They do not freeze well and should be bled immediately on capture.

In Australia, Diamond Trevally are found from south-west Western Australia around the tropical north down to the central coast of New South Wales, over coral reefs in coastal waters to 100metres.   They feed on fish, squid and crustaceans.

juvenile

Hillaries

 

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Pennantfish - Alectis ciliaris

Sat, 2010-01-30 18:51

Also known as African Pompano, Pennantfish are similar to Diamond Trevally (Alectis indica) but Pennantfish have a more rounded upper head profile than the angular head of the Diamond Trevally.   The eye of the Pennantfish is closer to the upper jaw than that of the Diamond Trevally.  Pennantfish are silvery metallic blue green on the upper body and silver elsewhere and the head is generally darker than the body.   There is a diffuse dark blotch on the opercle and in maturing adults, there may be a black blotch at the base of the soft dorsal fin.

Juvenile Pennantfish have extremely long trailing filaments from the dorsal and anal fins, which are not present in adults.  The base of these trailing filaments are dark blue to black. Young fish are deep bodied with five or more chevron shaped dark bars. 

Pennantfish have been recorded at 23kgs and 1.5 metres in length.

They are considered average eating.

In Australia, Pennantfish are known from Dunsborough Western Australia, around the tropical north to southern New South Wales, living in inshore and contintental shelf waters to 100m.

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Bumpnose Trevally - Carangoides hedlandensis

Mon, 2010-02-01 13:50

Bumpnose Trevally are silver with a greenish blue back fading to a silver white belly.  There is a blackish blotch on the upper opercular margin.  The long spinous dorsal fin and the soft dorsal fin rays and anal fin ray are black and the filaments and lobe often blackish.  The caudal fin has black trailing and leading edges and the pelvic fin is dusky. 

Juveniles often have 5 - 7 vertical crossbars on their sides. 

Bumpnose Trevally grow to 32cms. 

They are considered average eating. 

In Australia, Bumpnose Trevally are found from Exmouth Gulf Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Bludger Trevally - Carangoides gymnostethus

Mon, 2010-02-01 13:55

Bludger Trevally have an elongate body with a green blue back, silver belly and a few brown spots in the mid lateral band and a faint operculum spot  The dorsal, anal and tail fins are olive green with the soft dorsal and anal fins having white lobe tips.  The long pectoral fins and pelvic fins are transparent green.  The breast is scaleless.

Juvenile fish are more oval than elongate, with a silver green body and a few brown spots mid-laterally. 

Bludger Trevally grow to 14.5kgs and 90cms in length. 

They are not rated well as eating fish due to oily flesh. 

In Australia, Bludger Trevally are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Barcheek Trevally - Carangoides plagiotaenia

Wed, 2010-02-03 01:17

Barcheek Trevally are slender bodied silver fish, recognised by their strongly protruding lower jaw and the black margin to the preoperculum, behind and below the eye, giving a barred cheek appearance.  The curved part of the lateral line is longer than the straight rear part.  Large adults occasionally have small yellow spots scattered on their sides.   The caudal, second dorsal and anal fins are dusky and the leading edge of the pelvic fin is white.  The long pectoral fins are pale.  The breast is totally covered with scales.

Barcheek Trevally are recorded at 50cms in length, however the fish in this photo was 70cms. 

They are considered superior table fish.

In Australia, Barcheek Trevally are found from the north-west of Western Australia, around the tropical north to northern Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Brassy Trevally - Caranx papuensis

Wed, 2010-02-03 02:02

Brassy Trevally are a brassy to yellow-greenish colour on their backs fading to silvery white on the belly.   The head and body above the lateral line is scattered with small black spots, which become more numerous with age.  There is a distinct pale silvery white spot near the upper operculum.  The fins are dusky yellow with the exception of the tail fin which has a dusky upper lobe and a pale yellow lower lobe and a distinctive narrow white band on the trailing edge. 

Juveniles generally lack the brassy tinge, being silver all over. 

Brassy Trevally grow to 6.5kgs and 88cms in length. 

Brassy Trevally are found from Exmouth Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to Sydney NSW. 

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Silver Trevally - Pseudocaranx georgianus formerly dentex

Mon, 2010-02-08 01:25

Also known as Skippy and White Trevally, Silver Trevally are long bodied with a grey/green or blue back fading to silver sides and occasionally darker vertical bands are present.  There is a large black diffuse spot on the rear edge of the operculum above the pectoral fin.  Juveniles have mid-body yellow stripe from the mouth to the tail base which may still be present in young adults.  The fins are transparent except the ventrals which are white and the anal fin has a white margin.  The caudal fin is dark and there are scutes near the tail fin.  The mouth is relatively small and the libs are rubbery.

Juvenile Silver Trevally are often confused with Sand Trevally (Pseudocaranx wrighti).

Silver Trevally grow to 12kg and 94cms in length. 

They are considered good firm-fleshed table fish and must be bled immediately on capture. 

In Australia, Silver Trevally are found from North West Cape Western Australia, south around the entire coast, including Tasmania, then north to southern Queensland. 

   

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Sand Trevally - Pseudocaranx wrighti

Mon, 2010-02-08 01:39

Regularly confused as juvenile Silver Trevally, Sand Trevally are elongated, silver fish with a slight yellow tinge, sometimes with very faint yellow vertical stripes.  There is a small well defined black spot on the operculum.  Silver Trevally have a larger more diffuse spot on the operculum.  The dorsal, caudal and ventral fins are pale yellowish.  Sand Trevally have fewer scales along the lateral line than the Silver Trevally although the scales are larger.

Sand Trevally grow to 30cms in length.

They are considered good firm-fleshed table fish but must be bled immediately on capture.

Sand Trevally are found in southern Western Australia and along the southern coast to Victoria, including northern Tasmania.

 

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Bluefin Trevally - Caranx melampygus

Mon, 2010-02-08 01:51

Bluefin Trevally are silver on the upper body fading to a white belly.  The upper half of the body is speckled with blue/black spots, becoming more profuse with age.  Bluefin Trevally are easily identified by the electric blue colour of the second dorsal, caudal and anal fins. The transparent pectoral fin is elongated and extends to the commencement of the tail scutes. 

Juvenile Bluefin Trevally do not have the bright blue fins but have dark fins and a yellow pectoral fin.  They may have up to five dark vertical bars on their sides.

Bluefin Trevally grow to 43.5kgs and 1.17 metres in length. 

They are firm fleshed, good table fish. 

In Australia Bluefin Trevally are found from Margaret River Western Australia around the tropical north, and south to Sydney New South Wales.

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Giant Trevally - Caranx ignobilis

Mon, 2010-02-08 02:09

Giant Trevally are deep bodied, bluish-silver to almost black, sometimes with a yellow hue.  Their sides are yellowish silver and they have a small oval-shaped patch of tiny scales on the breast.  The upper sides may be covered by a scattering of small black dots.  They have a steep head profile and strong scutes along the rear lateral line.  There is no dark spot on the rear of the operculum.

Juveniles are silvery green on the back with a silver to gold belly and their soft dorsal, anal and tail fins are pale yellow. 

Giant Trevally grow to 63kgs and 1.7 metres in length. 

Small GTs are good eating but over 10kg are poor tasting. 

In Australia Giant Trevally are found from the central coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north and south to the New South Wales central coast. 

   Juvenile 

 

 

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Gold Spot Trevally - Carangoides fulvoguttatus

Mon, 2010-02-08 02:43

Also known as Turrum, Gold Spot Trevally have an elongate silver body with small golden spots and 4 - 5 vertical bands  on the upper body.  There may also be dark blotches along the lateral line towards the tail and faint black spots on the gill cover.  The fins have a yellowish tinge.  They have no scales up to the base of the pectoral fins. 

Juvenile Gold Spot Trevally are bright silver blue with six faint vertical black bars over the body and few, if any, small golden spots. 

They grow to 12kgs and 1.3 metres in length. 

Small fish are reasonable eating though strong flavoured, larger fish are poor eating. 

In Australia they are caught from south west Western Australia around the tropical north, then south to southern Queensland. 

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Longnose Trevally - Carangoides chrysophrys

Mon, 2010-02-08 02:56

Also known as Club-nosed trevally, Longnose trevally have a silvery to blue-green back and a silver belly and a speckling of small brownish-black spots over the sides.  There is a large black spot on the upper operculum and a long pectoral fin reaching to the straight portion of the lateral line.  They have a gently sloping head profile except between the snout and mouth where it is vertical, giving them the name Club-nosed trevally. They have no scales up to the base of the pectoral fin. 

Juvenile Longnose Trevally have elongated leading rays of the second dorsal and anal fins which disappear as the fish mature.  They do not have spots on the body.

Longnose trevally grow to 4.5kgs and 60cms. 

They are considered good eating. 

In Australia they are found from Exmouth Gulf Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to northern New South Wales.

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Blue trevally - carangoides ferdau

Mon, 2010-02-08 03:11

Blue Trevally are silver with a tinge of blue/green in their backs and five to six darkish bars on the side of the body and sometimes with faint golden spots above the lateral line.  The pectoral fin is long and curved and they have a forked tail.  The snout is bluntly rounded and the profile of the head is more convex above the eyes than below. 

Blue Trevally grow to 8kgs and 70cms. 

They are good eating. 

In Australia, Blue Trevally are found from the central coast of Western Australia, around the tropical  north, and south to southern New South Wales. 

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Thicklip Trevally - Carangoides orthogrammus

Wed, 2010-02-10 00:13

Also known as False Bluefin Trevally,Thicklip Trevally are silver to blue-grey with several ovate yellow spots on the middle of the side and well separated scaleless areas on the breast and base of the pectoral fins.  The body is compressed with a row of scutes on the caudal peduncle.  The dorsal, anal and caudal fins are blue.  Occasionally there are chevron shaped bars on the body.  Large adults develop a prominent snout. 

Thicklip Trevally grow to 6kgs and 70cms in length.

They are considered average eating.

In Australia, Thicklip Trevally are found from south west Western Australia, around the tropical north then south to central New South Wales, around oceanic islands, sandy channels of lagoons and seaward reefs, at depths from 3 - 160 metres.


 

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Golden Trevally - Gnathanodon speciosus

Wed, 2010-02-10 00:26

Golden Trevally are elongate silver fish with darkish stripes which fade with age.  They are silver when caught but become golden when they die.  The fins are yellow and there are often black spots on their sides.  

Juvenile Golden Trevally are bright yellow with dark vertical bars.

Golden Trevally grow to 37kgs and 1.2metres long. 

They are good eating but must be bled immediately on capture. 

In Australia, Golden Trevally are found from Shark Bay Western Australia around the tropical north then south to northern NSW. 

  juveniles  

   

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Queensland School Mackerel - Scomberomorus queenslandicus

Wed, 2010-02-10 00:39

Also known as dog mackerel, Queensland School Mackerel have a silver-grey body, an iridescent blue-green dorsal area and two indefinite rows of  bronze-grey blotches. The first dorsal fin has a black membrane and the second dorsal fin and finlets and caudal fins are pearly grey with darker margins while the pelvic fins, anal fin and finlets are white.  Qld School mackerel can be differentiated from spotted mackerel by a patch of white on their dorsal fin. 

Queensland School Mackerel grow to 12.2kgs and 1 metre in length. 

Juveniles do not have blotches until over 9.5 cm in length. 

They are rated as good table fish.

In Australia Queensland School Mackerel are found from Shark Bay in Western Australia north around to Sydney New South Wales. 

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Spotted Mackerel - Scomberomorus munroi

Wed, 2010-02-10 00:46

Spotted Mackerel are bright silver with a blue dorsal area and a broad band of four irregular rows of large dark spots along the middle of each side.  The first dorsal fin is blue with a dusky blotch on the front section.  The inside of the pectoral fin is dark blue to black.   Other fins are greyish-white. 

Spotted Mackerel grow to 10kgs and 1 metre in length although up to 6kgs is more common.

They are considered good table fish, but should be bled and kept on ice on capture. 

In Australia, Spotted Mackerel are found from Rottnest Island Western Australia, around the tropical north to Wollongong New South Wales, in offshore open waters away from reefs and shoals.

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Shark mackerel - Grammatorcynus bicarinatus

Wed, 2010-02-10 01:03

Also known as Scaly Mackerel because the scales peel in large sheets, Shark mackerel are silvery blue or green in the dorsal area fading to silver with dark spots on the belly. There is a distinguishing double lateral line which divides at the pectoral fin and joins again at the tail base. 

Grows to 12kgs and about 1.3 metres in length.  General catch is around 3-6kgs. 

They are considered average eating.  The flesh has a strong smell of ammonia, hence 'shark' mackerel. 

Shark Mackerel are endemic to Australia, found from Geographe Bay Western Australia, north around Qld and south to northern NSW. 

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Slimey Mackerel - Scomber australasicus

Fri, 2010-02-12 01:33

Also known as Blue Mackerel, Slimey Mackerel have the same streamlined shape as their much larger relatives and are generally bluish-green with narrow wavy bars on their back and a line of spots on the side.  There are 5 -6 finlets behind both second dorsal and anal fins.  The skin is soft and slippery. 

Slimey Mackerel grow to 1.5kgs and 65cms in length but are usually caught half that size. 

Rich in Omega3 and can be eaten if gilled, bled and cleaned when caught.  However they are generally considered as excellent bait for tuna. 

Slimey Mackerel are caught in all Australian waters, preferring temperate seas. 

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Broad-barred Spanish Mackerel - Scomberomorus semifasciatus

Fri, 2010-02-12 01:51

Also known as Grey Mackerel, Broad-barred Spanish Mackerel are distinguished from other mackerel by the black area of the dorsal fin and twenty or more broad blue-black vertical bars overlying the flanks.  These bars, which are broader and fewer than the Narrow Barred Spanish Mackerel, fade upon capture and death.  Broad barred Spanish Mackerel have a silver belly and the back can be vivid blue or dark bluish-grey and they have a deeper body than other mackerel of similar size.  The mouth has a single row of fine teeth in both jaws. 

Broad-barred Spanish Mackerel grow to 8kgs in weight and 1 metre in length.

They have a strong flavour and red meat.

In Australia Broad-barred Spanish Mackerel are found from Shark Bay Western Australia north around to northern NSW. 

Coral Bay

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Narrow-barred Spanish Mack-Scomberomorus commerson

Fri, 2010-02-12 02:13

Narrow-barred Spanish Mackerel are the largest of the mackerel species, identified by up to 50 narrow vertical bluish grey bars on their silver purple body.  When caught they display a range of iridescent greens and blues which fade quickly.   They have a  mouthful of sharp, finely serrated teeth.  The large dip in the lateral line below the second dorsal fin is a clear identifying feature of the narrow-barred mackerel. 

Spanish Mackerel can weigh 45kgs and grow to 2.2 metres. 

They are good eating when bled, gutted and put on ice on capture. 

In Australia, Narrow-barred Spanish Mackerel are found from Perth Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to Sydney NSW.  Occasionally they are caught off the Victorian and Tasmanian coast. 

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Blue Lined Emperor - Lethrinus laticaudis

Mon, 2010-02-15 00:48

Officially known as Grass Emperor, and in Western Australia as Black Snapper and Blue Lined Emperor, these fish are tan, brown or yellow with scattered irregular blotches which sometimes form indistinct bands across the body.  When caught these brown blotches become more distinct.  There are speckled white spots on the cheeks and diagnostic short blue lines radiating in front of and behind the eye.  These lines do not extend right down the cheek like the spangled emperor.  Sometimes a number of blue lines cross the forehead connecting the eyes.  The fins are pale or yellow with mottling and the caudal fin is pinkish-red in colour. 

Blue Lined Emperor grow to 5kgs and 60cms. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Blue Lined Emperor are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, north around tropical waters to southern Queensland, over coral reefs. 

 

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Yellowtail Emperor - Lethrinus Atkinsoni

Mon, 2010-02-15 01:03

Yellowtail Emperor are bluish/grey, tan or yellowish on the upper sides with a white belly.  The steep head is brown with red lips.  The fins are pale yellow or orange.  The base of the pectoral fins, anal fin and edges of the pelvic, dorsal, anal and caudal fins are often red.  Sometimes a broad yellow area is present along the middle of the sides extending to the tail. 

Yellowtail Emperor grow to 2.2kgs and 50cms in length. 

They are considered to be very good eating. 

Yellowtail Emperor are found from Quobba Western Australia, around the tropical north to southern Queensland in seagrass beds and outer reef slopes.

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Orange-spotted Emperor - Lethrinus erythracanthus

Mon, 2010-02-15 01:17

Orange-spotted Emperor are the largest species of Lethrinus.  Their deep bodies are brown to dark grey with indistinct scattered dark and light markings on the lower sides.  The head and blunt snout may have small orange spots.  The bright orange caudal fin is an identifying factor.   The caudal fin is slightly forked with the tips becoming rounded in adults.  The pectoral and pelvic fins are orange and the dorsal and anal fins are mottled orange and bluish.  The thick fleshy lips are orange or red.

Orange-spotted Emperor grow to 90cms.

They are considered good eating.

In Australia, Orange-spotted Emperor are found from north west Western Australia, around the tropical north to the northern Barrier Reef Queensland in outer reef slopes and adjacent soft bottom areas in depths to 120m.

  caught in Bali.

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Spot Cheek Emperor - Lethrinus rubrioperculatus

Mon, 2010-02-15 01:31

Spot Cheek Emperor are also known as red-eared emperor because of the reddish spot on the upper margin of the operculum.  These fish are grey to brown with irregular small dark blotches, pinkish fins and they have an elongate shape with a fairly small head.  The lips are often red.  They are often confused with the pink-eared emperor, which has a rounder body. 

Spot Cheek Emperor grow to 50cms in length. 

They are very good eating. 

In Australia, Spot Cheek Emperor are found from NW Cape in Western Australia north around to the Great Barrier Reef in Queensland. 

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Spangled Emperor - Lethrinus nebulosus

Mon, 2010-02-15 01:35

Also known as Nor'west Snapper, Spangled Emperor are named after the spangly effect of the pale blue spots on each scale.  Their body is golden to olive with a number of broad blue bars radiating from the eye down to the jaw.  The spots are less obvious on the light yellowish belly.  The top lip is yellow, the inside of the mouth is bright pinkish yellow and the front teeth are small and sharp.  All fins are yellow with blue speckles or bars.

Spangled Emperor grow to 10kg and 94cms in length. 

They are considered very good eating, needing to be bled and chilled immediately on capture.

Spangled Emperor are found from south-west (Rottnest) Western Australia, up around the tropical north, Qld and south to the central coast of NSW. 

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Yellowlip Emperor - Lethrinus xanthochilus

Tue, 2010-02-16 01:16

Yellowlip Emperor are yellowish/grey with scattered darker spots, large yellow upper lip and a bright red spot at the base of the pectoral fin.  They have large eyes for feeding at night, distinct scales and strong spines on the fins.  The fins are lighter and the edges of the dorsal and caudal fins are orange to reddish.

Yellowlip Emperor grow to 70cms in length. 

They are excellent eating. 

Yellowlip Emperor are found from north west Western Australia, north around the tropical coast to southern Queensland. 

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Red Spot Emperor – Lethrinus Lentjan

Tue, 2010-02-16 23:48

Also known as Pink Eared Emperor, Red Spot Emperor have an olive-green back becoming paler on the belly, and a red spot on the rear edge of the gill cover and at the base of the pale pinkish pectoral fin.  The pelvic, anal and dorsal fins are white to orange and the caudal fin is mottled orange or reddish.  The inside of the mouth is bright red.  Red Spot Emperor are deep bodied and not as elongated as Spot-Cheek Emperor. 

Red Spot Emperor grow to 58cms. 

They are very good eating. 

In Australia, Red Spot Emperor are found from NW Cape Western Australia north around to the Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Longnose Emperor - Lethrinus olivaceus

Tue, 2010-02-16 23:59

Longnose Emperor are grey with scattered irregular dark blotches fading to cream on the belly. The long, pointed snout has wavy dark streaks and the upper jaw near the corner of the mouth is sometimes edged with red. Occasionally there may be some red on the face and fins of large courting males. 

Longnose Emperor grow to 10kgs and 1 metre in length and are one of the largest, longest snouted Lethrinid. 

They are considered excellent table fish. 

In Australia, they are found from North West Cape Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

Monte Bellos

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Red Throat /Sweetlip Emperor - Lethrinus miniatus

Wed, 2010-02-17 00:32

Red Throat/Sweetlip Emperor (formerly Lethrinus chrysostomus) are olive green on the back fading to a silvery belly.  They are usually red-orange around the eyes, with a red dorsal fin, a red patch at the base of the pectoral fins and the corner and inside of the mouth is also red.  There are sometimes a series of dark bars on the side. 

Red Throat Emperor grow to 6.7kgs and 90cms in length.  

They are excellent eating. 

In Australia Red Throat Emperor are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, north around to northern New South Wales.  Occasionally they are found as far south as Perth WA.

Two Rocks

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Blue Spotted Emperor - Lethrinus hutchinsi

Wed, 2010-02-17 01:56

Also known as Lesser Spangled Emperor, Blue Spotted Emperor have blue spots on the cheeks, a whitish oblique bar behind the eye and a brown band from the eye to the jaw.  They do not have blue lines like Spangled Emperor and Blue Lined Emperor.  The spots are larger than those of the Blue Lined Emperor (which has short blue lines radiating from the eyes).  There may be reddish margins on the pectoral, dorsal and caudal fins.  On capture, the Blue Spotted Emperor will often have brown bars on the sides which fade after death.

Blue Spotted Emperor grow to 3kgs and 60cms. 

They are considered very good eating. 

Blue Spotted Emperor are found in tropical waters off north western Western Australia.

  caught off Mindarie WA

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Crimson Snapper - Lutjanus erythropterus

Thu, 2010-02-18 00:45

Known as Small-mouthed Nannygai in Queensland and Saddletail Sea-perch (not to be confused with Saddletail Snapper (Lutjanus malabaricus), Crimson Snapper are crimson red fading to a lighter shade on the belly. The head profile is convex.  The red dorsal, pectoral, anal and tail fins have a dark grey to black edge. 

Juvenile Crimson Snapper have an oblique darkish band through the eye and a black spot at the caudal peduncle. 

Crimson Snapper grow to 10kgs and 82cms in length. 

They are good eating. 

In Australia Crimson Snapper are found from North West Cape Western Australia, north around to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Saddletail Snapper - Lutjanus Malabaricus

Thu, 2010-02-18 01:11

Also known as Scarlet Sea Perch and in Queensland as Large-mouthed Nannygai, Saddletail Snapper are oval-elongate shape, uniformly scarlet with a darker saddle between the dorsal fin and tail.  In larger fish the saddle may be faint, there may be narrow orange lines on the body and all fins are the same colour as the body.  The profile of the head can be straight or very slightly concave. 

Juvenile fish have a broad reddish band extending from the snout through the eye and a dark saddle bordered with pearly white between the dorsal fin and the tail. 

Saddletail Snapper grow to 7kgs and 1 metre in length. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Saddletail Snapper are found from north west Western Australia north around the tropical coastline to Rockhampton Queensland. 

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Red Bass - Lutjanus Bohar

Thu, 2010-02-18 01:18

Red Bass are often confused with Mangrove Jack (lutjanus argentimaculatis) but can be differentiated by a conspicuous groove which runs from the nostrils to the front of the eye. 

Red Bass can range from light orange to a deep reddish brown, fading along the sides to a silvery pink belly.  Below the lateral line the scales which have a pale centre, form  faint pink bands running to the tail.  There may also be some yellow on the cheeks and throat.  The spined dorsal fin is dark red/black, always with a black base and edge, and the pelvic fin, anal fin and the tail are blackish red.  The snout is pointed, the tail fin is slightly indented and the ventral and anal fins may have a white margin.   The eye is red.

Juvenile red bass have one or two silvery white spots on the back near the rear of the soft dorsal fin. 

They grow to 12kgs and 1 metre in length. 

Red Bass are reported to be good eating however they are prone to ciguatera poisoning. 

In Australia Red Bass are found along the north west coast of Western Australia and the northern Great Barrier Reef to southern Queensland. 

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Mangrove Jack - Lutjanus argentimaculatus

Thu, 2010-02-18 01:42

Mangrove Jack are often confused with Red Bass (Lutjanus Bohar) but they do not have the black fins of the Red Bass.  Mangrove Jack have a bronze metallic upper body with a reddish lower body.  The fins are uniformly reddish and the anal fin may have a white edge. 

Juveniles have a brown body with creamy vertical bars on their sides and blue lines around their eyes.  Their fins are red with darker areas and a white margin. 

Mangrove Jack grow to 10kgs and 90cms but are usually caught between 2-4kgs. 

They are excellent eating with firm, sweet white flesh. 

In Australia, Mangrove Jack are found from the central coast of Western Australia, north around the tropical north, and south to central New South Wales. 

juvenile

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Darktail Snapper - Lutjanus Lemniscatus

Thu, 2010-02-18 01:47

Darktail Snapper are pinkish brown on their back and head, fading to a whitish belly.   The dorsal and caudal fins are dusky brown/maroon, often with a fine white margin.  The anal, pelvic and pectoral fins are pale with some pinkish/brown.  The head is steeply sloped and the snout profile is slightly concave.  Orange spots are sometimes visible on the head.

Juveniles have a broad black horizontal band from snout tip to caudal fin base and larger juveniles have a black mid-lateral stripe. 

Darktail Snapper grow to 65cms long. 

They are considered good eating. 

In Australia Darktail Snapper are found from north west Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to central Queensland. 


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Red Emperor - Lutjanus sebae

Fri, 2010-02-19 01:00

Red Emperor are scarlet or salmon pink with red fins narrowly edged with white. The cheeks are scaled and there is a deep notch in the lower edge of the pre-operculum (inner cheekbone). The tail has a deep red mark at the top and bottom with a white or pinkish middle divide. 

Juveniles have three distinctive red bands which fade with age. 

Red Emperor grow to 25kgs and more than 1 metre in length. They are highly prized eating fish. 

In Australia, Red Emperor are found from the Abrolhos Islands Western Australia, north around the tropical coast and south to Moreton Bay in southern Queensland. 

 

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Brownstripe Snapper - Lutjanus vitta

Fri, 2010-02-19 01:03

Also known as Striped Sea Perch, Brownstripe Snapper are cream to bright pink with a distinct olive or brown stripe running from the eye to the tail.  There are oblique thin stripes above the lateral line and horizontal fine stripes below the lateral line.  The midline at the back and the tail are always golden yellow and the fins are yellow to orange and the anterior dorsal and anal fins have white margins. 

Juveniles have a black mid-lateral stripe and an oval black eye sized spot in the middle of the stripe below the last dorsal spines. 

They grow to 40cms. 

Brownstripe Snapper are good eating. 

In Australia, Brownstripe Snapper are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north to southern Queensland. 

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Fingermark Seaperch - Lutjanus johnii

Fri, 2010-02-19 22:41

Also known as Golden Snapper, Fingermark Seaperch have an elongate oval reddish bronze back fading to a white belly.  A reddish brown spot on each scale gives the appearance of horizontal lines.  A distinguishing large dark blotch, which varies in colour and intensity, is located below the soft dorsal fin. 

Juveniles have a distinctive large black spot with a white edge below the soft dorsal fin. 

Fingermark Seaperch grow to 11kgs and 1 metre in length. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Fingermark Seaperch are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

 

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Moses Perch - Lutjanus russelli

Fri, 2010-02-19 23:01

Also known as Moses Snapper and Russell's Snapper, Moses Perch are elongate oval fish varying in colour from pinkish red to olive green.  The fins are pink to yellowish.  There is a diffuse dark spot (often faint) below the start of the soft dorsal fin but above the lateral line.  The snout is quite pointed.

Juveniles are similar shape to adults, but silver with four to five golden stripes with a dark spot.   

Moses Perch grow to 2kgs and 50cms. 

They are considered good eating. 

In Australia, Moses Perch are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north then south to Coffs Harbour New South Wales, in depths from 3 - 80 metres.  They inhabit inshore reefs and rocky areas, feeding on benthic invertebrates and fish.

juvenile

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Spanish Flag - Lutjanus carponotatus

Fri, 2010-02-19 23:45

Also known as Stripey Seaperch, Spanish Flag are silvery blue with eight to nine broad golden horizontal stripes from the eye to the tail.  The tail and all fins are bright yellow and there is a diagnostic black spot at the base of the pectoral fin. 

Spanish Flag grow to 1.4kgs and 40cms in length. 

They are considered reasonable eating. 

Spanish Flag are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to central Queensland, in shallow waters and around coral reefs.

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Maori Seaperch - Lutjanus rivulatus

Sat, 2010-02-20 00:40

Also known as Maori Snapper and Blubberlips, Maori Seaperch are bronze to grey, with small white spots and distinguishing undulating blue lines on the head.  They have blubbery lips.  Fins and outer tail parts are yellow. 

Juveniles have a series of 3 - 8 brown bars on the sides and a white spot below the anterior soft dorsal ray. 

Maori Seaperch grow to 4kgs and 75cms in length. 

They are very good eating. 

Maori Seaperch are found from the Abrolhos Islands Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to southern Queensland.

                      

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Five-lined Snapper - Lutjanus quinquelineatus

Sun, 2010-02-21 01:53

Also known as Bluebanded Sea Perch and Fiveline Snapper, Five-lined Snapper have a yellow body with five iridescent blue horizontal lines on the body.  A round black blotch (sometimes diffuse) the size of the eye is on the back below the soft dorsal fin rays but above the lateral line.  The fins are bright yellow.

Five-lined Snapper grow to 38cms in length.

In Australia, Five-lined Snapper are found from Shark Bay Western Australia around the tropical north, then south to central New South Wales.  They inhabit sheltered lagoons and exposed outer slope coral reefs in small groups in water usually 30-40 metres deep.  They feed on fish and crustaceans.

  caught at Mindarie


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Remora - Echeneis naucrates

Mon, 2010-02-22 13:55

Commonly referred to as Remora, but in fact Slender Suckerfish, these are long slender fish with a large sucking disc located on the head with 18 to 28 laminae (cross flaps) which attach temporarily to various hosts such as sharks and rays.  The Slender Suckerfish are white with distinct horizontal dark stripes along the body but larger individuals may be completely grey.  The lower jaw projects well beyond the upper jaw. The disc is a highly modified dorsal fin and positioned from the top of the head to the anterior part of the body.  The pectoral fins are very high on the sides of the body and the dorsal and anal fins are long-based with elevated leading rays.. 

Remora grow to about 1 metre in length. 

In Australia, Remora are found from south west Western Australia, north around the tropical north, then south to southern New South Wales and occasionally in Victorian and Tasmanian waters.   Remora eat cast off food scraps from their host, parasites on the host, plus other small fish.

 

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Black Snoek - Thyrsitoides marleyi

Mon, 2010-02-22 14:05

Black Snoek belong to the family of fish that includes Escolars, Gemfishes and Snake Mackerels.  Black Snoek are elongate, dark brown fish with slightly metallic reflections, sometimes paler on the belly.  There are two lateral lines, the upper line running along the first dorsal fin base and ending at the beginning of the second dorsal fin, and the lower line starting below the 4-5th dorsal spine and ending in the tail.  There is a black blotch on the first dorsal membrane and up to 18 spines in the dorsal fin. The pelvic fins are well developed and the caudal peduncle lacks keels.  The mouth is large with fang like teeth at the front of the upper jaw.  The bottom jaw protrudes significantly beyond the upper jaw.

Black Snoek grow to 1.9 metres in length.

They are not highly rated as a table fish, the flesh being oily, with a possible strong laxative effect on some people.

In Australia, Black Snoek are found in waters off all States, except Victoria and Tasmania.  They are a deep water predator, to 400 metres, coming into shallower water at night.  They are known as a mesobenthopelagic fish.

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Snake Mackerel - Gempylus serpens

Mon, 2010-02-22 14:20

Snake Mackerel belong to the family Gempylidae, which also includes gemfish, oscolars, oilfish and snoeks.  Snake Mackerel are elongated metallic brown compressed fish.  The mouth is large with fang-like teeth and the lower jaw protrudes beyond the upper.  All fins, including two dorsal fins are dark brown with darker margins.  There are two lateral lines, both originating below the first spine of the dorsal fin.  The upper lateral line follows the dorsal contour of the body to the end of the first dorsal fin base.  The lower line descends gradually posterior to about the tip of the pectoral fin and runs mid-laterally. 

Snake Mackerel grow to 1 metre in length.

They can be eaten smoked or dried.

Snake Mackerel occur worldwide in tropical and subtropical oceanic waters.  They are usually solitary, staying in deep water during the day and rising to the surface to feed at night.

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Gemfish - Rexea solandri

Mon, 2010-02-22 15:01

Also known as Hake, and often confused with Barracouta (Thyrsites atun), Gemfish are iridescent silvery blue and darken to blue/purple after capture.  The body is elongate and scaleless with a forked lateral line.  There are two dorsal fins followed by two separate finlets.  There is a prominent black blotch on the outer margin and between the first three spines of the first dorsal fin.  The pelvic fin comprises a tiny spine and two or three rays.  The mouth is large, reaching to under the front of the eyes and is full of efficient blade like teeth. 

Gemfish grow to 15kgs and 1.35 metres in length.

They are considered very good eating and are of high commercial value. 

In Australia, Gemfish are found from central Western Australia, around the southern coast to southern Queensland, including Tasmania, inhabiting deep water and generally found in large schools at depths of 100-800 metres.

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Common Silverbiddy - Gerres subfasciatus

Mon, 2010-02-22 15:12

Also known as Roach and Silver Belly, Common Silverbiddy are silver with a long based dorsal fin.  The anterior spines are black tipped and longer than those in the rest of the fin.  The pelvic and anal fins are yellowish and the caudal fin is dark.  The jaw is protrusible, protruding out and forming a tube, which the fish use to feed on bottom dwelling invertebtrates.  They are often mistaken for small bream.

Common Silverbiddy grow to 23 cms in length.

They are not well rated as table fish.

Common Silverbiddy are found from south-west Western Australia, around the tropical north then south to southern New South Wales, in estuaries and inshore waters.

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Southern Ray's Bream - Brama australis

Mon, 2010-02-22 15:36

Southern Ray's Bream are a compressed, uniformly silver fish with a greeny metallic back.  The nose is snub, the mouth is downward angled and the bottom jaw protrudes.  The dorsal and anal fins are elongate and the caudal fin is lunate.  The body is widest below the beginning of the dorsal fin and the pectorals reach to the middle of the anal fin.  The large eye is situated in the centre of the head.  There is no obvious lateral line.  Southern Ray's Bream are often confused with Ray's Bream (Brama Brama) which have a flatter forehead and more snub nose.

Southern Ray's Bream grow to 3 kg and 47 cms in length.

They are considered good eating, the flesh being firm and white.

In Australia, Southern Ray's Bream are found from Cape Naturaliste north to North West Cape in Western Australia and from southern Queensland to western Victoria, in deep waters.


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Purple Threadfin Bream - Pentapodus emeryii

Sun, 2010-02-28 01:37

Also called Double Whiptail Bream, Purple Threadfin Bream have a blue body with two yellow stripes running horizontally along their length, and a central whitish stripe.   The tail extends into two long blue filaments. 

Purple Threadfin Bream grow to 30cms. 

Most often used as aquarium fish.

In Australia, Purple Threadfin Bream are found off north west and northern Western Australia. 

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Japanese Sea Bream - Gymnocranius euanus

Sun, 2010-02-28 02:14

Also known as Paddletail Seabream, Japanese Seabream are silvery white to grey with scales with a brown base spot.  Prominent black blotches are scatteredacross the body.  A bar is sometimes present below the eye to the lower edge of the cheek and the eye is relatively large.  The caudal fin is sometimes dusky reddish-brown with a moderate fork and blunt tips and the fins are clear to reddish.  Sometimes there are faint spots on the dorsal, caudal and anal fins. 

Japanese Seabream grow to 45cms in length. 

They are considered very good eating. 

Japanese Seabream are found from north west Western Australia, north around the tropical coast and south to southern Queensland. 

 

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Black Bream - acanthopagrus butcheri

Sun, 2010-02-28 21:39

Black Bream are bronzy/black on their back and sides fading to white on the belly with dusky pectoral, pelvic and anal fins and a small black spot at the base of the pectoral fin.  The dorsal fin is long based with strong spines at the front and soft rays at the rear.  Mature fish often have a blue tinge on the nose area.

Black Bream grow to 4kgs and 60cms in length. 

They are considered very good eating. 

Black Bream are endemic to Australia, found from southern Victoria, south around the coast to Shark Bay Western Australia, and including Tasmania. 

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Common Buffalo Bream - Kyphosus sydneyanus

Sun, 2010-02-28 22:51

Also known as Silver Drummer, herbivorous Common Buffalo Bream are silver to grey with a dark spot below the pectoral fin base.  The pectoral fins are short and rounded and all fins are generally dark grey, the caudal fin with a dark margin.  They are deep bodied with a short head, the appearance of a moustache and a small mouth with fine teeth in both jaws.   The tail is squarish.

Western Buffalo Bream (Kyphosus cornelii) are distinguished by their smaller size, no 'moustache' and differently shaped tail with a dark streak on each tail lobe and a thin white margin.

Common Buffalo Bream grow to 12kgs and 80cms in length.  Western Buffalo Bream grow to 2kgs and 60cms.

They are very poor eating. 

Common Buffalo Bream are found on coastal rocky reefs, in harbours and bays from south of Shark Bay Western Australia, around southern waters to southern Queensland, including Tasmania.  

Western Buffalo Bream are endemic to Western Australia and found from Cape Leeuwin to Shark Bay with a large population in the Abrolhos.

Western Buffalo Bream

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Tarwhine/Silver Bream - Rhabdosargus sarba

Sun, 2010-02-28 23:06

Also known as Silver Bream, Tarwhine are deep bodied silver fish with lines of brown spots forming golden stripes running the length of the body.  They have a blunt  snout.  The pelvic and anal fins are usually yellow but fade with age.  Tarwhine have a black lining to their gut cavity.

Tarwhine grow to 3kgs and 80cms in length.

They are considered good eating if bled immediately and guts and black stomach lining removed.

In Australia, Tarwhine are found from Albany to Shark Bay Western Australia and from the Great Barrier Reef Queensland to Gippsland Victoria.

 

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Yellowfin Bream - Acanthopagrus latus and australis

Sun, 2010-02-28 23:19

Western Yellowfin Bream (Acanthopagrus latus) are silvery grey fading to white on the sides and belly.  The pectoral, anal and pelvic fins are yellow.   The tail is yellow with a dark margin.   There maybe a bump on the forehead near the eyes.   Colour fades on death.

Western Yellowfin Bream grow to 1.5kgs and 50cms in length.

Western Yellowfin Bream are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Gulf of Carpentaria Queensland, in rivers and coastal estuaries where salt and freshwater mix.  

Karratha WA 

 

Eastern Yellowfin Bream (Acanthopagrus australis) are deepbodied bronze (from upper estuaries) or silver (from ocean waters) fish with yellowish pelvic and anal fins.    The caudal fin is dusky yellow with a black margin and there is usually a black blotch at the base of the pectoral fin.  There may be a bump on the head near the eyes.

Eastern Yellowfin Bream grow to 4.5kgs and 66cms in length.

They are endemic to eastern Australia, from Townsville Queensland to Lakes Entrance in eastern Victoria.

They are both considered good table fish.  Bream from ocean waters have moist sweet and white flesh while upper estuary bream are softer with a muddy taint.

Eastern Yellowfin Bream Qld

 

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Robinson Sea Bream - Gymnocranius grandoculis

Sun, 2010-02-28 23:24

Robinson Sea bream are silver with thin brown scale margins giving a golden brown appearance and with distinct wavy blue lines across the snout, cheek and operculum.  The fins are yellow, the tail fin is brown with a yellow margin and there is a narrow brown bar across the base of the pectoral fins.  They have large eyes in a moderately steep forehead and large adults develop a bony ridge over the front part of the eye. 

Juveniles often have 5 or 6 dark bars on the side and a dark bar below the eye. 

Robinson Bream grow to 5.5kg and 80cms. 

They are good eating. 

In Australia Robinson Sea Bream are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north to the southern Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

 

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Two-lined Monocle Bream - Scolopsis bilineata

Mon, 2010-03-01 00:47

Also known as Bridled Monocle Bream, Two-lined Monocle Bream are dark grey on the upper body and pearl white below.  There is a black-edged white bar curving up from the mouth to the middle of the dorsal fin and two narrow yellow stripes on the head above the eyes.  The spinous dorsal fin is yellow and there is a white area on the back below the soft dorsal fin.  There is a red area at the rear of the dorsal fin.  The anal fin is black.

Juveniles have 3 dark brown stripes on the upper part of the body, interspaced between yellow stripes.

They grow to 25cms in length.

Two-lined Monocle Bream are popular aquarium fish. 

Two-lined Monocle Bream are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to central New South Wales, inhabiting tropical reefs, feeding on small fish and benthic invertebrates.

 

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Rainbow Monocle Bream - Scolopsis monogramma

Mon, 2010-03-01 01:10

Rainbow Monocle Bream have a blue/grey dorsal area with silver sides and a series of angled yellow dots that can form a solid stripe on the side of the body.   There are three blue stripes on the snout which are often separated by orange, a blue stripe behind the eye and a blue stripe running underneath the eye bending down towards the pectoral fin base.  The dorsal fin is yellow and the tail fin is yellow with a blue margin and elongated tips. 

Juvenile Rainbow Monocle Bream have a broad black stripe from the snout through the eye and along length of the body to the caudal fin, and two broad black stripes each side of the dorsal fin running the length of the body. 

Rainbow Monocle Bream grow to 30cms. 

They are average eating. 

In Australia, Rainbow Monocle Bream are found from the central coast of Western Australia around the tropical north, and south to central New South Wales.

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Pikey Bream - Acanthopagrus berda

Mon, 2010-03-01 01:30

Pikey Bream are deep bodied, dark silver-grey or dull olive-brown with brassy reflections on the upper back fading to a paler belly.  There is a fine dark margin along the dorsal fin and the spines are often silvery.  The pectoral fins are dusky with a yellow tinge and the soft dorsal, anal and pelvic are black-blue.  The caudal fin is moderately forked and dark.  The snout is pointed and they have thick rubbery lips.   They have a very stout second anal spine.  Often confused with Black Bream, but Black Bream have a distinctive black spot at the base of the pectoral fin, which Pikey Bream don't have.

Pikey Bream grow to 4kgs and 66cms in length.

They are considered good eating. 

Pikey Bream are found from Shark Bay Western Australia north around the tropical coast to central Queensland. 

Gove NT

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Frypan Bream - Argyrops spinifer

Mon, 2010-03-01 01:41

Sometimes called Longspine Snapper and King Soldierbream, Frypan Bream have a steep head profile and a deep body coloured silvery pink, usually darker on the head.  The operculum is usually red on the margin of the upper part.  The dorsal and tail fins are pink with red margins and the long dorsal spines are red.  The pelvic and pectoral fins are pale pink to white. 

Juveniles have several vertical red bars on the body. 

Frypan Bream have been recorded at 4kgs and 70cms. 

They are very good eating. 

In Australia, Frypan Bream are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, north around to southern Queensland, on the inner continental shelf to depths of 150m.

 

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Mozambique Bream - Wattsia mossambica

Thu, 2010-03-04 15:09

Mozambique Bream have a silver-grey body with a yellow tinge, yellow lips and fins and a dark patch at the base of the pectoral fin.  There may be faint brown spots on the dorsal, anal and caudal fins, which have very strong spines. 

Mozambique Bream grow to 55cms in length. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Mozambique Bream are found from Shark Bay Western Australia north to the west Northern Territory and south to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Lined Javelinfish - Hapalogenys kishinouyei

Tue, 2010-04-13 01:31

Also known as Fourstripe Grunter, Lined Javelinfish are light greyish brown with 2 - 5 longitudinal dark brown stripes on their upper body.  There may be a vertical band on the caudal peduncle.  All fins are grey in adults, growing darker with maturity from juvenile stage.  The pectoral fins are short and the caudal fin is rounded.

They grow to 34cms in length.

Lined Javelinfish are considered very good eating.

In Australia, Lined Javelinfish are found from Rottnest Island Western Australia, around the tropical north to the northern Barrier Reef Queensland, in waters 5-50 metres deep and usually over mud or sand. 


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Spotted Javelinfish - Pomadasys kaakan

Tue, 2010-04-13 02:10

Also known as Barred Javelinfish and Spotted Grunter because of the grunting noise they make on capture, adult Spotted Javelinfish are slender silver fish with a golden tint on the sides.  The upper operculum is olive-yellow, the snout dusky with yellow.   All  fins, including the square cut tail are clear.  The lower lobe of the tail is blotched in white towards the tip.  There is a strong, spear-shaped anal spine.   The mouth is relatively small.

Juveniles have 7 to 11 vertical bars comprised of small dark spots over the upper sides.  There are also dark spots between the spines and rays of the dorsal fin. These spots fade with maturity, along with the silver blue to green back of the dorsal area of the juvenile which fades to silver.

Spotted Javelinfish grow up to 6kg and 66cms in length.

They are considered good eating and freeze well.

Spotted Javelinfish are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north to northern New South Wales. 

Exmouth

adult

juvenile

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Silver Javelinfish - Pomadasys argenteus

Tue, 2010-04-13 02:16

Also known as Small-spotted Grunter-Bream, Silver Javelinfish are silver with numerous scattered dark brown spots.  The ventral and anal fins are tinged with yellow.  Larger fish may have dark blotches on the dorsal fin.  

Juveniles are pale brown with a lighter belly and the back has irregular longitudinal streaks on alternate scale rows.  They also have dusky membranes on the dorsal fin.  There is a dark spot on the gill cover.

Silver Javelinfish grow to 5kgs and 60cms in length.

They are considered very good eating.

In Australia, Silver Javelinfish are found in coastal inshore waters of the Northern Territory, the Gulf of Carpentaria and the Queensland coast to northern New South Wales. 

juvenile

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Dolphinfish - Coryphaena Hippurus

Sat, 2010-04-17 11:46

Also known as Mahi Mahi and Dorado, Dolphinfish are very colourful elongate fish.  When excited or stressed they flash different iridescent colour patterns, cycling rapidly through shades of silver, blue, green and yellow, with brilliant blue spots over the head and body.  The bigger the fish, the more spectacular the colours.  The very long dorsal fin is rich deep blue.  The colours fade quickly to grey after death.   The belly is white and the body tapers to a thin caudal peduncle.  The caudal fin is deeply forked.

Juveniles and females have a more streamlined head profile and are less brightly coloured than the males.  

Large males are known as Bull Dolphinfish because of the prominent high forehead.  The males are bigger and more brightly coloured than females.

Dolphinfish grow to 40kgs and 2 metres in length.

They are highly regarded table fish.  

In Australia, Dolphinfish are found from Geographe Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to Bermagui New South Wales.  

male

same fish within 2 minutes

 

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Cobia - Rachycentron Canadus

Sat, 2010-04-17 11:50

Also known as Ling, Cobia have a dark brown solid and tapered body with a cream belly and two well defined silver stripes on their sides from eyes to tail.  Their head is broad and flattened with a wide mouth which does not extend back to its eyes, and a protruding lower jaw.   The front dorsal fin is a series of short independent sharp spines which flatten in a groove before the rear high soft dorsal fin.  All fins are dark and the anal fins are a small replica of the dorsal fin.  Adult cobia have a forked, slightly lunate tail. 

Juvenile cobia have more distinct striping and a straighter tail. 

Cobia grow to 68kg and 2.2 metres in length. 

They have a firm texture and are considered good eating, with a strong flavour. 

In Australia, the tropical pelagic Cobia are occasionally found from Cape Naturaliste Western Australia during summer, but commonly around the tropical north then south to Jervis Bay New South Wales.

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Rainbow Runner - Elegatis bipunnulata

Sat, 2010-04-17 12:13

Rainbow Runner are elongate fish, green to blue dorsally with a white belly.  They have two light blue stripes on the sides separated by wider yellow to greenish stripe, extending from the eye to the tail, which is yellow and deeply forked. There are two separate finlets behind both the dorsal and anal fins.  There are no scutes on the lateral line. 

Rainbow Runner grow to 13kgs and 1.2metres, although they are generally caught up to 6kgs. 

The white, moist flesh is good eating as long as the fish is cleaned and iced immediately on catching. They make excellent skip-bait. 

In Australia, Rainbow Runner are found from south west Western Australia around the tropical north and south to southern New South Wales. 

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Finny Scad - Megalaspis cordyla

Sat, 2010-04-17 12:16

Also known as Torpedo Scad, Finny Scad are slender silver fish with a blue-grey dorsal area and a jet black spot at the rear of the gill cover.  They have a long pectoral fin, slender elongated tail base section, prominent bony scutes on the straight part of the lateral line, 7-9 dorsal finlets and 8-10 anal finlets. 

Finny Scad grow to 1.6kgs and 80cms in length. 

Good for bait.

Finny Scad are found from Fremantle Western Australia, around the tropical north to south Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Dusky Morwong - Dactylophora nigricans

Sat, 2010-04-17 12:22

Dusky morwong are green to grey with a whitish belly and dark spots on the dorsal and caudal fins. They have a long slender body with a prominently forked tailfin. They have downturned large lips and the pectoral fins have extended rays.

Juvenile Dusky Morwong are silver with rows of orange spots on the sides of the body. They have deeper bodies than more mature fish and dark bands on the upper sides that extend through the dorsal fin.

Dusky Morwong grow to 1.2metres in length.

They are not good eating. Bait only.

Dusky Morwong are endemic to Australia, found from south west Western Australia around the southern coast to southern New South Wales.

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Queen Snapper - Nemadactylus valenciennesi

Sat, 2010-04-17 12:56

Also known as Southern Blue Morwong, Queen Snapper are bright blue to silvery blue with distinctive radiating yellow lines around the eyes and often with a dark blotch in the middle of the side.  The yellowish tail fin is deeply forked and the fish has an extended ray on the pectoral fin.  The lips are thick. 

Queen Snapper grow to around 11kgs in weight and 1 metre in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

Queen Snapper are found from Lancelin Western Australia around the southern coast to Port Phillip Bay Victoria, including Tasmania.  They are found over reefs and sponge gardens. 

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Red Lipped Morwong - Cheilodactylus rubrolabiatus

Sat, 2010-04-17 13:03

Red lipped Morwong have a pale brown body with seven dark brown bars and intense brown spots and blotches between the bars.  The fins are also pale with brown spots.  They are a moderately large fish with large rubbery red lips. 

Red Lipped Morwong are recorded at 45cms in length. 

The flesh is white, firm and reasonable eating. 

Red Lipped Morwong are endemic to Western Australia and are found from Coral Bay, south to the Recherche Archipelago Esperance. 

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Black Jewfish - Protonibea diacanthus

Sat, 2010-04-17 13:16

Also known as Northern Mulloway, Black Jewfish are silver/bronze or grey in colour and often turn dark grey after death giving them their name.  They have large scales, needle like teeth, a convex caudal fin and a narrower tail wrist than Mulloway. 

Juvenile fish have three to five dark bars on their back and many small black spots on their upper body, dorsal fin and tail.   As the fish grow, the bars and spots become obscure.

Black Jewfish can exceed 45kgs and 1.5metres in length. They are fast growers and live for at least 12 years.

They are considered better eating than southern Mulloway and are an important food source in northern Australia.

In Australia, Black Jewfish are found from Onslow Western Australia, around the tropical north to southern Queensland, in estuarine and coastal waters, over muddy bottoms and offshore to depths of 100 metres, feeding on crustaceans and small fish.  They are reputed to be strong fighters.

juvenile

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Mulloway - Argyrosomus japonicus/hololepidotus

Sat, 2010-04-17 13:38

Also known as Jewfish and River Kingfish, Mulloway have a powerful elongate body coloured dark bronze with a green tinge and a silvery belly. They have large scales, a big mouth and a line of silvery spots along the lateral line. There is a black spot above the pectoral fin and the tail fin is slightly convex.

Mulloway can exceed 50kgs when fully grown and 2metres long. 

They are average eating and do not freeze well because of the soft flesh.

In Australia, Mulloway are found from Exmouth Gulf Western Australia, south around the coast north to Rockhampton Queensland.  They are rare in Tasmania. 

Claremont

 

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Yellowtail Kingfish - Seriola lalandi

Sat, 2010-04-17 13:49

Yellowtail Kingfish are streamlined fish with a solid body of deep blue/green separated from a silvery belly by a rich yellow-gold band. The dorsal and pectoral fins are grey-blue, the pelvic and anal fins are yellowish and the tail is a bright yellow. It has small teeth.

The Yellowtail Kingfish weighs up to 52kgs and grows to 2metres in length.

Small YTK up to 6kgs are reasonable eating if they have been gutted, bled and iced immediately on capture.

 

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Highfin Amberjack - Seriola rivoliana

Sat, 2010-04-17 14:02

Highfin Amberjack are olive to blue green or to brown in the dorsal area and pale below.  There may be a faint amber stripe from the eye along the middle of the body.  There is a diagonal stripe through the eye of young fish which becomes less distinct with age.  The caudal fin has a dusky margin, the anal fin has a white tip and the pectoral and pelvic fins are dusky.  The anterior lobe of the second dorsal fin is longer than the pectoral fin.

Highfin Amberjack grow to 15kgs and 1 metre in length.

They are considered average eating and must be bled and gutted on capture.

In Australia, Highfin Amberjack are found from southern Western Australia around the tropical north then south to southern New South Wales.

 

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Blackbanded Amberjack - Seriolina nigrofasciata

Sat, 2010-04-17 14:15

Blackbanded Amberjack adult fish are bluish-grey flushed with dull pink and with a dusky to white belly.  The spinous dorsal fin is always black and the second dorsal fin and anal fin are dusky brown.  The caudal fin is widely forked caudal and brown to black and the caudal peduncle is narrow.  The profile of the head is strongly convex, giving a rounded appearance.  There is a band through the eye.

Juveniles have dark circular blotches forming five to seven dark oblique bands on their upper body which fade with age.  The second dorsal, and anal fins have white tips.

Blackbanded Amberjack grow to 53kgs and 1.7 metres in length.

They are considered average eating.

Blackbanded Amberjack are found from Perth Western Australia, around the tropical north to northern New South Wales, in offshore reefs near continental shelfs at 20-150m.

juvenile

                

 

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Amberjack - Seriola Dumerili

Sun, 2010-04-18 01:46

Often confused with Samsonfish (Seriola Hippos), the Amberjack can be pink to purple/brown or bluish grey on the dorsal area fading to silver sides and a creamy belly.  There is often a broad gold/amber stripe running from the eye to the tail along the middle of the body.  There is often a darker bar through the eye to the dorsal fin.  There are no scutes, the tail fin is dusky, sometimes with a white tip on the lower caudal fin lobe.  The soft dorsal fin is around twice the length of the anal fin. The head is steeper than a yellowtail kingfish but not as blunt as a samsonfish. The rays in its anal fin total 19 or more. 

Juveniles have a deep body which becomes more elongated as they grow. 

Amberjack grow to 80kgs and 1.9 metres in length. 

Small fish are reasonable eating and must be bled, gutted and kept on ice. Bigger amberjacks are coarse and tasteless and should be released. 

Amberjack are found from Albany in southern Western Australia, around the tropical north, and south to Wollongong New South Wales. 

 

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Samsonfish - seriola hippos

Sun, 2010-04-18 01:50

Samsonfish (sambos) are elongate fish, varying in body shape and colouration according to maturity.   Adults are usually silver with a brownish to bronze back and occasionally with a yellow stripe along the side.   After capture they take on a barred pattern and after death become darker brown.  They have a forked caudal fin, the dorsal and anal fins are elevated anteriorly and the pectoral fins are small. 

Samsonfish (sambos) are often confused with Amberjack (seriola dumerili) which are a more streamlined fish.   For positive identification, the rays in the samsonfish anal fin should number no more than 17 and in the amberjack, 19 or more.  Amberjack have a purplish-brown back and caudal fin.

Juveniles have blunt heads and broad vertical bars on the body. 

Samsonfish grow to 53kgs and 1.75metres in length. 

They are considered good eating up to 10kgs but must be gutted and bled immediately upon capture. Larger fish have coarse flesh. 

In Australia Samsonfish are found from the central coast of Western Australia south around to Yorke Peninsula South Australia and from southern Queensland to southern New South Wales. 

Juvenile, Swan River

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Striped Tuna - Katsuwonus pelamis

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:04

Also known as Skipjack Tuna, Striped Tuna have a rounded, elongated body with a purple/blue back, silver sides and a white belly with 4-6 conspicious horizontal dark bands. There are two dorsal fins separated by a small space, the first with 14-16 spines, the second followed by 7-9 finlets. The pectoral fins are short. The body has no scales except for the lateral line and a strong keel is present on each side of the caudal fin base between two smaller keels. 

Striped Tuna grow to 20kgs and 1.1metres in length. 

Dark red meat with a strong flavour however if bled promptly and kept on ice is palatable. Good for smoking. Good live bait for marlin, sharks and big tuna. 

Striped Tuna are found in all Australian waters. 

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Yellowfin Tuna - Thunnus albacares

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:16

Yellowfin Tuna are dark metallic blue, changing to silver on the belly and with about 20 white vertical lines. There is a golden horizontal stripe running from eye to tail and often an iridescent blue stripe running parallel. The second dorsal and anal fin and the finlets between those fins and the tail are bright yellow, giving the fish their name. Larger Yellowfin (40kgs) are characterised by an extended second dorsal fin and anal fin giving the appearance of a sickle. The caudal keels on the wrist of the tail are dusky and never yellow as in the Southern Bluefin Tuna. 

Juvenile yellowfin tuna have shorter dorsal and anal fins. 

YFT can grow to over 100kgs and 2.1metres in length. 

Yellowfin are rated second to Southern Bluefin Tuna for sashimi and behind Albacore when cooked. Bleeding and chilling the fish immediately on capture greatly improves the quality. 

They are found in all Australian waters.

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Mackerel Tuna - Euthynnus affinis

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:20

The Mackerel Tuna has wavy green lines in the rear portion of the body above the midline. The first dorsal fin reaches almost to the second dorsal. It has two to five dark spots above the ventral fin and prominent teeth. 

Mackerel Tuna reach about 10kgs in weight and 1metre in length. 

They are considered poor eating. 

In Australia Mackerel Tuna are found from the central coast of Western Australia around the tropical north then south to southern New South Wales. 

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Big-Eye Tuna - Thunnus obesus

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:22

Big-eye Tuna have a metallic blue-black back fading to silver on the belly with a faint iridescent blue band along the sides (in live specimens) and often a wider gold band under that. The first dorsal fin is deep yellow and the rear dorsal fin is dark brown and edged in black, lacking any yellow. The finlets are bright yellow edged in black. In adults, the pectoral fins end directly below the beginning of the second dorsal fin. Big-eye adults have relatively large eyes compared to other tuna. The liver has no dark streaks like Yellowfin Tuna.    A diagnostic tool for ID is a strong lateral keel between two small yellow keels, located slightly further back on the tail, on either side of the caudal peduncle.  The tail is dark in colour.  On death, the Big-eye Tuna loses all yellow colouration and the fins turn brown.

Juvenile Big-eye often have 7-10 white unbroken stripes crossing the lower sides vertically. Juvenile Big-eye have longer pectoral fins than adult Big-eye. 

Big-eye tuna grow to around 120kgs in Australia and 2.4metres in length. Excellent for sashimi and need to be bled immediately upon capture and put on ice. 

They are found throughout Australian tropical and subtropical waters when surface temperatures exceed 17ºC. 

 

     photo courtesy NOAA

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Albacore - Thunnus Alalunga

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:26

Sometimes called Longfin Tuna, Albacore have a deep blue body with black back and a creamy belly. They are easily identified by the very long pectoral fins extending well behind the commencement of the second dorsal fin. They are also recognised by a dark yellow first dorsal fin and pale yellow second dorsal fin. The tail has a white edge.

Juveniles have shorter pectoral fins but the distinctive white rear border of the tail fin identifies albacore from juvenile yellowfin or bigeye tuna.

They grow to 40kgs and 1.5 metres in length.  

Albacore are considered very good eating with firm white flesh and a delicate texture.  They need to be bled quickly, gutted and kept on ice.

Albacore are found in all Australian waters, but most commonly in waters well offshore of Australia's southern half, usually in schools.

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Dogtooth Tuna - Gymnosarda unicolor

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:33

Dogtooth Tuna have an elongate dark blue body fading to a silver belly and an undulating lateral line. The fins and tail are dull grey with a yellowish tinge. The two separate dorsal fins are not as high as in other tuna and are followed by 6 - 7 finlets.  The pectoral fins are very short, only about half the height of the front dorsal.  They have a large mouth with conical teeth in both jaws. 

Dogtooth Tuna grow up to 100kgs and 1.6 metres. 

They are found in most Australian tropical waters with the exception of the Gulf of Carpentaria. 

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Longtail Tuna - thunnus tonggol

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:38

In Australia often called Northern Bluefin Tuna (Thunnus thynnus), Longtail Tuna are the easiest tuna to identify.  Longtail have a long slender tail and the body is deepest near the middle of the first dorsal fin base.  They are dark blue to black on upper 1/3 of the body and silvery white on the lower 2/3 with elongated colourless spots arranged in horizontal rows on the underside and belly. The pectoral fin is short and finishes in front of the start of the second dorsal fin, which is higher than the first dorsal fin. The dorsal, pectoral and pelvic fins are blackish, the tip of the second dorsal and anal fins are washed with yellow, the anal fin is silver, the dorsal and anal finlets are yellow with greyish margins and the tail fin is dark with streaks of yellow/green. 

Longtail Tuna grow to 36kgs and 1.5metres in length. 

They have red flesh which needs immediate bleeding. It is strong in flavour. 

In Australia, Longtail Tuna are found from Geographe Bay Western Australia, north around to Eden, southern New South Wales. 

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Blackfin Tuna - Thunnus Atlanticus

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:48

Blackfin Tuna have oval shaped bodies, black backs with a slight yellow on the finlets and a yellow stripe along the sides of their bodies. 

Blackfin Tuna are the smallest tuna species in the Thunnus genus generally growing up to 21kgs and 1metre long. 

The flesh is dark with a strong flavour. 

Blackfin Tuna are found only in the western Atlantic. 

FW member Clalo20    Blackfin Tuna from the Dominican Republic

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Southern Bluefin Tuna - Thunnus maccoyii

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:51

Southern Bluefin Tuna are large, streamlined silvery-white fish with a blue-black upper body and yellow tinged fins.  They have colourless transverse lines alternating with rows of colourless dots on the lower sides and are completely covered with small scales.  They can be identified by their short pectoral fins which do not extend to the second dorsal.  The second dorsal fin is yellowish, the anal fin and finlets are dusky yellow edged with black.  Keels are present near the tail and are yellow in juveniles and black in adults.  

Southern Bluefin Tuna grow to 158kgs and 2.4 metres in length.   They are longlived and mature between 10 and 12 years of age and can live to 40 years.

They are highly regarded food fish with their medium flavoured flesh valued for sashimi. They need to be bled and chilled on capture. 

In Australia, Southern Bluefin Tuna are found from north west Western Australia, south around to northern New South Wales including Tasmania.  They are highly migratory fish and spawn in tropical seas off north west Western Australia.  They school to feed and are carnivorous.  They are considered a top level predator in the marine environment being one of the fastest ocean swimmers, travelling in speed bursts of up to 70kmh while feeding.