FISHWRECKAPEDIA

FISHWRECKAPEDIA - A fish identification resource for Fishwrecked.com members. 

All images (unless otherwise noted) are from the Fishwrecked.com photo galleries, contributed to by over 45,000 Fishwrecked.com members.  

Fishwrecked.com is based in Western Australia, therefore the majority of fish images are local and are described using names common to Western Australia.

 

Page 1:  Trevally, Pennant Fish, Mackerel, Emperor/Lethrinus, Lutjanus, Remora, Black Snoek, Snake Mackerel, Gemfish, Common Silverbiddy, Bream (by common name), Javelin Fish, Dolphinfish, Cobia, Rainbow Runner, Finny Scad, Morwong, Queen Snapper, Jewfish, Mulloway, Kingfish, Amberjack, Samsonfish, Tuna

Page 2:  Rockcod and Cod (by common name), Chinaman Fish, Trout (by common name), Harlequin, Herring, Threadfin, Sweetlips, Western Foxfish, Blackspot Pigfish, Black Rabbitfish, Flutemouth, Pike, Snook, Barracouta, Longtom, Flathead, Triggerfish, Queenfish, Banded Archerfish, Boarfish, Jawfish, John Dory, Trumpeter, Sergeant Baker, Gobbleguts, Scaleyfin, Fusilier, Flounder

Page 3:   Gulf Saratoga, Dart, Sand Bass, Perch (by common name), Sooty Grunter, Jobfish, Snapper (by common name), Nannygai, Swallowtail, Wrasse, Parrotfish, Tuskfish, Baldchin Groper, Barracuda, Wahoo, Bonito, Leatherjacket, Western Rock Blackfish, Hapuku, Groper, Blue-eyed Trevalla, Barramundi Cod, Breaksea Cod, Tailor, Western Butterfish, Silverspot, Boxfish, Barred Soapfish, Orange Roughy, Tripletail, Rock Ling, Giant Sea Catfish, Cobbler, Sweep, Yellow tail Scad, Whiting

Page 4:  Weeping Toadfish/Blowfish, Norwest Blowie, Gurnard, Western Fortescue, Western Red Scorpionfish, Red Lionfish, Bluespine Unicornfish, Western Blue Devilfish, Barramundi, Western Frogfish, Wirrah, Rainbow Cale, Zebrafish, Murray Cod, Dhufish, Northern Pearl Perch, White Sturgeon, Slinger Seabream, Grinner, Bonefish, Tarpon, Mullet, Batfish, Convict Surgeonfish, Western Striped Cardinalfish, Shaw's Cowfish, Stripey, Moonlighter, Slender Seamoth, Knifejaw, Scissortail Sergeant, Southern Sea Garfish, Longtom, Frostfish, Goatfish, Marlin, Shortbill Spearfish, Sailfish, Bullseye, Silver Moony, Salmon

 

 

Bibliography:  www.fish.wa.gov.auwww.australianmuseum.net.auwww.efishalbum.comwww.wikipedia.comwww.aims.gov.au, www.fishbase.org,  Australian Fish and How to Catch Them (Richard Allan ISBN 1-863026746), Field Guide to Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South East Asia (Gerald R. Allen ISBN 9781920843397), Sea Fishes of Southern Australia (Barry Hutchins, Roger Swainston ISBN 1-875169-78-4), The Marine Fishes of North-Western Australia, A Field Guide for Anglers and Divers (Gerald R. Allen, Roger Swainston ISBN 0 7309 2113 1), Grant's Fishes of Australia (E.M. Grant ISBN 0 7316 0234 X), Field Guide to Marine Fishes of Tropical Australia and South-East Asia (Gerald R. Allen ISBN 978-1-910843-39-7).

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Flagtail Rockcod - Cephalopholis urodeta

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:54

Flagtail Rockcod are identified by two white diagonal bars on the tail fin.  They are reddish brown and much darker towards the tail, often with six faint bars across the back. They have small orange-red spots on the head and shoulders and two dark spots on the lower lip.

Flagtail Rockcod grow to 28cms in length. 

Because of their small size, they are popular in the aquarium trade.

In Australia, Flagtail Rockcod are found from south-west to north west Western Australia and the northern Great Barrier Reef, Queensland, on coral reefs.

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Coral Cod - Cephalopolis miniata

Sun, 2010-04-18 02:59

Coral Cod can be brown to scarlet red and are covered by bright blue spots, often edged faintly in black, on their head, body and middle fins. They have a deep body and rounded tail.

Juvenile Coral Cod are orange to yellow with many spots.

Coral Cod grow to 45cms in length.

They are considered very good eating.

In Australia, Coral Cod are found from central West Australia, around the tropical north and down the east coast to northern New South Wales, inhabiting coral reefs.  They feed on fish and crustaceans and are found from 2 - 150 metres deep.

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Tomato Rockcod - Cephalophis sonnerati

Sun, 2010-04-18 03:04

Tomato Rockcod are orange to reddish/brown, scattered with numerous orange-red spots.  There can be whitish blotches.  They have a deep body and a hump-headed appearance.  The tail and rear part of the dorsal and anal fins are darker than the body and the pelvic fins can be darkish.  The tail fin is rounded and the pelvic fins usually extend to the anus. 

There is also a brown variety quite different in colouring. 

Tomato Rockcod grow to 58cms in length. 

They are considered good eating.

In Australia, Tomato Rockcod are found from central Western Australia, north around the tropical waters to southern Queensland. 

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Blue-lined Rockcod – Cephalopholis Formosa

Thu, 2010-04-22 12:29

Blue-lined Rockcod are dark yellow-green-brown with brilliant blue horizontal lines that cover the entire body, dorsal and tail fin.  There are blue spots on the snout, lower part of the head and the body.  Their eyes are set forward on their head and the mouth is very large.

Blue-lined Rockcod grow to 34cms in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

In Australia, Blue-lined Rockcod are found from Dampier Archipelago Western Australia northwards, and possibly as far south as The Great Barrier Reef Queensland, in and around coral reefs and rocky areas.

 

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Peacock Rockcod - Cephalopholis argus

Thu, 2010-04-22 12:30

Peacock Rockcod are brown/green/yellow with many small dark-edged blue spots on the head, body and fins.  There are five to six pale bars on the rear of the body and an identifying triangular pale patch at the base of the pectoral fin.  The tail, pelvic and anal fins are dark.

Peacock Rockcod grow to 60cms in length.

They are highly regarded table fish.

In Australia, Peacock Rockcod are found from central Western Australia, around the tropical north to central Queensland.  Found to depths of 40 metres but prefer 1-10 metre reef zone.

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Radiant Rockcod - Epinephelus radiatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 12:32

Often confused with Comet Grouper, Radiant Rockcod have five distinct brownish/olive broad radiating bands on the head and body.  There are small dark brown spots visible between these bands. 

Radiant Rockcod grow to 70cms in length. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Radiant Rockcod are found from Shark Bay Western Australia around the tropical north to southern Queensland, in deep coastal waters 80-350m.  

caught off Rockingham April 2011

Radiant Rockcod top/Comet Grouper bottom

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Banded Grouper - Epinephelus amblycephalus

Thu, 2010-04-22 12:34

Also known as Blunt-headed Rockcod, Banded Grouper are pale grey with five broad brown bars.  There are small black spots on the dorsal area, mainly along the edges of the bars.  There is a small saddle blotch on the nape with small black spots.  There is a distinct yellow marking above the upper jaw.  The dorsal and caudal fins have pale yellow margins. 

Juveniles are white with black bars and the fins are pale yellow with small black spots. 

They grow to 50cms in length. 

Banded Grouper are very good eating. 

In Australia, Banded Grouper are found from North West Cape Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

Coral Bay

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Hexagon Rockcod - Epinephelus hexagonatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 12:35

Also known as Wirenet Rockcod, Hexagon Rockcod have large brown spots on the head, body and fins, separated by a pale hexagonal 'wire-netting' pattern.  There are four to six dark saddle blotches on the back and a large brownish mark behind the eye. 

Hexagon Rockcod grow to 30cms in length. 

They are good eating. 

In Australia, Hexagon Rockcod are found from north west Western Australia, and the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Camouflage Rockcod - Epinephelus polyphekadion

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:14

Also known as Camouflage Grouper, the Camouflage Rockcod is often confused with Flowery Cod (Epinephelus fuscogguttatus).  The Camouflage Rockcod is creamy brown with large irregular darker brown blotches across the body.  Tiny dark spots cover the entire body including all the fins.  A distinguishing feature is the dark saddle spot between the soft dorsal fin and the tail fin.  Camouflage Rockcod have more distinct oblique bands, a larger spot on the tail stem and fewer pectoral fin rays than the Flowery Cod.

Juvenile Camouflage Rockcod have a lighter body colour than adult fish.  Darker spotting is also present as well as the distinctive saddle spot. 

Camouflage Rockcod grow to 1 metre in length.

They are excellent eating. 

Camouflage Rockcod are found from Carnarvon Western Australia, around the tropical north to the southern Great Barrier Reef Queensland, in coral reef lagoons, outer reefs and caves in waters from 1m to 46m.

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Frostback Rockcod - Epinephelus bilobatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:22

Frostback Rockcod are pale brown with a dense pattern of large gold brown spots covering the entire body, and with distinct dark blotches on the dorsal ridge. They are identified by a white area on the upper back. Their tail fin is lunate. 

Frostback Rockcod grow to 40cms. 

They are considered good eating. 

Endemic to Western Australia, Frostback Rockcod are found from Point Quobba Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Northern Territory border.

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Flowery Cod - Epinephelus fuscoguttatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:36

Flowery Cod are heavy bodied pale brown fish with irregular chocolate brown flowery blotches on the head, back and sides. The chest, stomach and ventral fins are profusely covered with smaller spots.  The tail fin is heavily spotted and rounded.  There is a distinct dip towards the rear of the eye which forms a hump on the head above the eyes.  

Flowery Cod grow to 11kg and 1 metre in length. 

They are considered excellent eating. 

In Australia Flowery Cod are found from the Dampier Archipelago Western Australia, around the tropical north and south to southern Queensland. 

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Greybanded Cod - Hyporthodus octofasciatus prev. Epinephelus

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:39

Also known as Eightbar Groper, Greybanded Cod juveniles and young adults are pale brown with eight broad dark brown vertical bars.  In adults the bands fade and they become uniformly greyish brown with a dark tail saddle blotch.  The soft dorsal, anal and pelvic fins are dark with a white margin.  There is a faint brown band from the eye to operculum. 

A 2007 publication changed the name of this species to from Epinephelus to Hyporthodus (Craig and Hastings 2007) and a change of family name to Epinephelidae (Smith and Craig 2007).

Greybanded Cod grow to 100kgs and 130cms in length and live to 56 years.

They are considered excellent eating.

In Australia, Greybanded Cod are found from South Australia, west and north around Western Australia to west Northern Territory, and then from Cape Yorke Peninsula to Sydney New South Wales, living in depths from 68-380metres.  They are demersal.

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Estuary Cod - epinephelus coioides

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:40

Also known as Goldspotted Rockcod, Estuary Cod are brown to yellowish brown with numerous small reddish brown spots, increasing with age.  There are four to six irregular oblique darker vertical bars on the body.  The fins are brown and the head, body and median fins have numerous small orange-brown spots.  The tail is rounded.

Estuary Cod grow to 230kgs and 2 metres in length. 

They are considered very good eating while smal but the flesh becomes coarse when larger.

In Australia, Estuary Cod are found from Rottnest Island Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to northern New South Wales.  They are more common in tropical waters.

Exmouth

Shark Bay

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Blackspotted Rockcod - Epinephelus malabaricus

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:43

Also known as Malabar Grouper, Blackspotted Rockcod are olive to brown and covered with small, well defined black/brown spots and irregular white spots and blotches.  These spots cover the entire body including the chest, lower jaw and roof of mouth and distinguish Blackspotted Rockcod from Estuary Cod (reddish/brown spots and no white blotches). 

Juvenile Blackspotted Rockcod have a number of wide irregular dark vertical bands across the rear of their body which disappear as they grow. 

Blackspotted Rockcod have been recorded at 150kgs and 2 metres in length, however commonly they are caught up to 25kgs and 1.2 metres. 

Smaller Blackspotted Rockcod are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Blackspotted Rockcod are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north to southern Queensland. 

Exmouth

juvenile

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Rankin Cod - Epinephelus multinotatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:53

Rankin Cod are dark purplish grey in colour with scattered irregular white blotches over the entire body.  These blotches fade with growth.  The tail is lunate.

They grow up to 9kgs and 1 metre in length.

They are considered good eating.

In Australia, Rankin Cod are found along the western coastline from Perth, north to Darwin.  Juveniles are found in inshore coral reefs and adults are more common in deeper water.  1-100 metres.

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Comet Grouper - Epinephelus morrhua

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:56

Also known as Comet Cod, Comet Grouper can be creamy yellow to pale brown and with solid-coloured, oblique brown bands running from the snout to the upper body.   There are no spots between these bands.  The fins are yellow and the tail is rounded. 

Comet Grouper grow to 7kgs and 90cms in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

In Australia, Comet Grouper are found from north western Western Australia, round the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

Radiant Rockcod top/Comet Grouper bottom

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Potato Cod - Epinephelus tukula

Thu, 2010-04-22 13:59

Potato Cod are large, inquisitive fish coloured grey to brown with large potato-shaped dark brown spots and blotches covering their body. There are small spots on the head and dark lines radiating back from the eye and small dark spots on the ends of the fins. Large adults may be almost black. 

Potato Cod weigh up to 110kgs and grow to a maximum length of around 2 metres. 

In Australia, Potato Cod are found off north west Western Australia around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

Potato Cod are a protected species in Western Australia. 

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Purple Rockcod - Epinephelus cyanopodus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:01

Purple Rockcod (also known as Blue Maori Cod) are large heavy bodied light blue-grey fish covered with fine black spots.  

Juvenile Purple Rockcod are mostly yellow becoming grey with dark spots.  The grey area increases until only the fins are yellow.

Purple Rockcod grow to 17.3kgs and 1.2 metres in length. 

They are excellent eating. 

In Australia, Purple Rockcod are found from The Northern Territory around to far northern Queensland, then south to central New South Wales.  The Australian Museum reports they are found in north west Western Australia.  They are usually seen in lagoons and on coastal reefs around coral or rocky outcrops in waters of 2m to 150m in depth.

 

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Yellowspotted Rockcod - Epinephelus areolatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:02

Yellowspotted Rockcod are pale greenish brown with numerous large round yellow/brown spots.  The tail is truncate (not round) with a distinct white margin.  There are no dark blotches on the dorsal region. 

Yellowspotted Rockcod grow to 1.4kgs and 45cms. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Yellowspotted Rockcod are found from north west Western Australia, round the tropical north to southern Queensland. 


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White lined Rockcod - Anyperodon leucogrammicus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:12

Also known as Slender Grouper, White lined Rockcod are grey to white with orange to gold spots covering the entire body and dorsal fin of adults.  There are distinctive horizontal white lines from the snout to the tail.  These lines may fade in larger fish.  The dorsal, caudal and anal fin are sometimes yellowish.

Juveniles are grey to pale blue with gold stripes running vertically along the body.

White lined Rockcod grow to 65cms in length.

They are highly regarded as table fish.

In Australia, White lined Rockcod are found from Exmouth Western Australia, around the tropical north then south to the southern Barrier Reef Queensland.  They are bottom dwelling (demersal) predators.

 

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Chinaman Rock Cod - Epinephelus rivulatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:14

Also known as Charlie Courts, Chinaman Rock Cod are red to brown in colour and have a large mouth and long dorsal fin with lobed soft dorsal.  They can be distinguished by 4 or 5 prominent broad oblique bars and sometimes there are white blotches on the throat and chest.  Each body scale has a small white spot creating a peppered appearance.   The lateral line is hard to see and the tail fin is usually round to emarginate.

Chinaman Rock Cod grow to 2kg and 45cms long.

They are considered very good eating.

Chinaman Rock Cod are demersal and found from Geographe Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north to southern New South Wales.

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Chinaman Fish - Symphorus Nematophorus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:17

Chinaman Fish should not be confused with Chinaman Cod (Epinephelus Rivulatus). 

Chinaman Fish are a mottled pink, yellow and red, forming indistinct vertical bars.  There is a deep groove between the eye and nostrils and the mouth is large, extending to below the beginning of the eye.  The tail is broad and straight with faint blue spots. 

Juveniles have blue horizontal stripes on a yellowish body with a brown back.  Sometimes there is faint vertical barring and they have elongated filaments on the rear of the dorsal fin. 

Chinaman Fish grow to 17kgs and 1 metre.

Chinaman Fish and Red Bass are recognised as the most likely fish to have ciguatera poisoning, however it is rarely found in Western Australia. 

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Vermicular Trout - Plectropomus oligacanthus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:20

Vermicular Trout are lavender to bright pinkish-red in colour with blue lines and short bars covering the face, front body area and fins.  There are numerous spots on the body and tail base.  

Juveniles have blue dots instead of blue lines.

Vermicular Trout grow to 1.2kgs and 75cms in length. 

They are excellent eating. 

In Australia, Vermicular Trout are found off north west Western Australia and north east Australia (Cape York to northern Great Barrier Reef Queensland), inhabiting drop-offs and steep channel slopes in depths from 24 - 50 metres.

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Common Coral Trout - Plectropomus leopardus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:22

Common Coral Trout vary from red to greenish brown and are covered with a profusion of small blue dots over the body and all fins except the pectoral fins, which are transparent.  Colour can vary with time of day, habitat and the activity of the fish.  There is a distinctive blue ring around the eye.  The soft dorsal fin is rounded and the lunate tail often has a fine white margin.  They have a large mouth and sharp widely spaced canine teeth.  

Common Coral Trout can grow to 15kgs and 75cms. 

They are excellent eating. 

In Australia they are found from NW Western Australia around the tropical north, and south to the southern Great Barrier Reef.  They are bottom dwelling (demersal).

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Bar-cheeked Coral Trout - plectropomus maculatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 14:27

Bar-cheeked Coral Trout have elongated blue spots on the head and shoulders which gradually become round as they progress towards the tail. They have a large mouth and sharp, widely spaced canine teeth. 

Bar Cheeked Coral Trout can grow to 15kgs although 5kgs is more usual. 

They are excellent eating. 

In Australia Bar Cheek Coral Trout are found north from the Abrolhos WA around to Gladstone Queensland. 

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Passionfruit Trout - Plectropomus areolatus

Thu, 2010-04-22 15:26

Also known as Squaretail Coral Trout/Grouper, Passionfruit Trout have a pale grey to brown body covered with large blue dark rimmed spots over the entire body including belly and lower jaw, dorsal, anal and tail fins.  They have a square tail edged with pale blue. 

Passionfruit Trout grow to 6kgs and 80cms in length. 

They are considered to be excellent eating. 

Passionfruit Trout are caught off the northern coast of Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Blue Spot Coral Trout - Plectropomus Laevis

Thu, 2010-04-22 15:45

Also known as Chinese Footballer Trout, there are two distinctly different common colour phases, the Blue Spot form (dark brown or red with distinctive blue spots) and the Footballer form (white and yellow with large black stripes).  Occasionally they can be seen changing colour ie light reddish head and near body fading to a yellow tail area with fewer spots.

Blue Spot Coral Trout are often confused with the common coral trout.  The difference between the two are the dark, opaque pectoral fins of the blue spot coral trout as opposed to the transparent pectoral fins of the coral trout.

Blue Spot Coral Trout grow to 25kgs and 1.4metres in length, almost twice the size of common coral trout.

They are considered excellent eating.

In Australia, Blue Spot Coral Trout are found from Dongara Western Australia, around the tropical north to the southern Great Barrier Reef, in waters up to 100m deep but are most usually found around 20 metres, off outer reef drop offs.

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Harlequin - Othos Dentex

Thu, 2010-04-22 15:47

Harlequin base colours can be red, orange, yellow or brown with darkish blotches on the head and upper sides, blue spots on the back and sides and yellow blotches on the underside.  There is a large red blotch at the base of the pectoral fin.  The tail is slightly convex, the eyes protrude and they have formidable teeth. 

Harlequin grow to about 75cms in length. 

They are excellent eating. 

Harlequin are endemic to Australia, occurring from the central coast of Victoria to south western Western Australia. 

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Coronation Trout - Variola Louti

Thu, 2010-04-22 15:58

Coronation Trout are vivid red or red-orange and are flecked with small purple to pink spots on the head, body and fins.  The distinctive tail is a lunar crescent shape with a yellow trailing edge. The fins are edged with yellow on the trailing edge, especially the pectoral fins.  The dorsal and anal fins have pointed posterior tips.

Coronation Trout grow to about 80cms. 

They are rated as excellent eating.

In Australia, Coronation Trout are found from central and north-west Western Australia and the northern Great Barrier Reef to central New South Wales, from close to the surface to over 100 metres in depth.  

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Brown trout - Salmo trutta

Thu, 2010-04-22 16:13

Brown Trout have a streamlined olive/brown body with black spots on the dorsal area, sides and head. The belly may be silver or golden depending on habitat. The spots spread below the lateral line and may be surrounded by a halo. The tail has a slight fork and the caudal peduncle is thick. 

Juvenile Brown Trout are often confused with juvenile Rainbow Trout and are distinguished by the adipose fin of the Rainbow Trout being usually more transparent with a black edge, and they are sometimes spotted.  The Brown Trout's fin is not transparent, never has any spots but has a red to orange dorso-posterior edge. 

Brown trout grow to 14kgs and 90cms in length in Australia. 

They are very good table fish. 

In Australia, Brown Trout are found from south west Western Australia around southern waters to north eastern New South Wales, including northern Tasmania, inhabiting cool streams, lakes and reservoirs. 

Harvey

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Brook Trout - Salvelinus fontinalis

Thu, 2010-04-22 16:32

Not a true trout, Brook trout can be identified by a distinct hump near the dorsal fin, but does not occur in the female. These fish are olive green with pale green patterns which form into cream spots on the sides, and a creamy belly (the males having an orange tint).  The dorsal and tail fins have dark wavy patterns and the pelvic, anal and tail fin have white leading edges.

They usually grow up to 6kgs and 30cms in length.

Excellent eating.

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Rainbow Trout - Oncorhynchus Mykiss

Thu, 2010-04-22 16:50

Rainbow Trout vary in colour according to their habitat.  Stream dwellers are more intense in colour with large numbers of small black spots scattered above the lateral line and sides.  Lake dwellers are more silvery and have fewer spots on a bluish green back and silver sides.  There is a pinkish red band along the sides of the body and the tail is moderately forked but square in larger specimens. 

Rainbow Trout grow to 9kgs and 35cms but are usually caught up to 2kgs. 

The flesh is white or pink and is good eating. 

Rainbow Trout are found from Perth Western Australia, round the southern coast and up to southern Queensland, including Tasmania.

juvenile Nanga Brook

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Salmon Trout - Arripis truttaceus

Tue, 2010-05-04 01:23

Salmon Trout are juvenile Australian salmon.  They are silvery white with dark brown spots that appear as lines on the upper back and larger tan spots on the sides.  The caudal fin is dark.  They are often confused with herring.

Salmon Trout grow to 1kg and 30cms in length.

They are an oily fish rich in Omega3 with dark meat and a strong flavour.  They need to be bled immediately on capture but are considered good eating and smoke well.

The western species (Arripis truttaceus) of Salmon Trout are found from Kalbarri Western Australia, around the southern coast to Lakes Entrance Victoria, including Tasmania.  The eastern species (Arripis trutta) are found in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania.  They are found in seagrass beds and over soft substrates in shallow and sheltered coastal waters.

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Herring - Arripis georgianus

Tue, 2010-05-04 01:24

Also known as Tommy Rough/Ruff and often mistaken for salmon trout, herrings' distinguishing features are a very large black eye, black tips on the tail and the rough texture of their scales.  The body is silver with a greenish tinge and golden spots and there is no dark blotch at the base of the pectoral fin. 

They grow to around 600gms and 40cms. 

Rich in omega3, herring have a strong taste and are best eaten very fresh.  Great for smoking. 

Herring are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, south around to Port Phillip Bay Victoria. 

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Perth Herring - Nematalosa vlaminghi

Tue, 2010-05-04 01:24

Also known as Bony Herring and Western Australian Gizzard Shad, Perth Herring are a deep bodied, compressed silver to grey fish with a blue tinge to the dorsal area.  They have a flared outward lower jaw and a dark blotch behind the gill opening.  The hind edge of the scales are toothed. 

Perth Herring grow to 36cms.

They are commonly used for bait in the crayfishing industry. 

Perth Herring are endemic to Western Australia.

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Giant Herring - Elops machnata/hawaiiensis

Tue, 2010-05-04 01:26

Giant Herring are sleek and silver bodied with a blue-green back and covered in small silvery scales that come easily away from the body.  They have a deeply forked tail and one dorsal fin.  The ventral and anal fins are transparent in juveniles and yellow with a fine black margin in adults.  The mouth is large.

Giant herring grow to 10.8kgs and 1.2 metres in length.

They are full of fine bones and are not good eating. 

Giant Herring are found from Albany Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to Port Hacking New South Wales. 

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Wolf Herring - Chirocentrus dorab

Tue, 2010-05-04 01:29

Wolf Herring have an elongate silver body with a blue-green back and dull yellow tail.  The single dorsal and anal fins are towards the rear of the body.  The mouth tilts upwards and has large canine teeth in both jaws.  There is a black marking on the upper part of the dorsal fin.

Wolf Herring grow to 1.4 metres in length.

They are poor eating due to small bones but make good fresh bait.

In Australia, Wolf Herring are found from Broome Western Australia, around the tropical north to central Queensland. 

 

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West Australian Salmon - Arripis truttaceus

Tue, 2010-05-04 01:31

West Australian adult salmon have an elongate streamlined green to steely blue body with yellow/grey spots and a silver belly.  They have a pointed nose, large mouth and small yellow eyes.  There can be a yellow tinge on the sides and the fins are grey, the pectoral fins being tinged with yellow and the tail is deeply forked. 

Juvenile salmon are often referred to as salmon trout and can be confused with adult herring.  Juveniles are silvery white, smooth scaled and have several rows of brown  spots on their back and sides.  Herring have black tips on their tail and their body feels rough (Tommy Rough) to the touch while salmon feel smooth. 

West Australian Salmon reach 9kgs and 96cms in length. 

Eating quality is debatable.  Generally good for curry or mornay.  They are good smoked.   West Australian Salmon are found from Kalbarri WA, south around the coast to Lakes Entrance Victoria.    

 

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Blue Threadfin - Eleutheronema tetradactylum

Thu, 2010-05-06 01:26

Also known as Bluenose Salmon, Blue Threadfin are silvery green to blue on the head and upper back and silvery white to cream on the belly.   They have a divided pectoral fin with the lower part containing four short cream filaments.  These filaments are shorter and thicker than those on the King Threadfin.   The fins are grey sometimes with a tinge of yellow.  The dorsal and powerful forked caudal fin may have a fine black margin. 

Blue Threadfin grow 15kgs and 1.2 metres in length. 

They are excellent eating. 

In Australia, Blue Threadfin are found from North West Cape Western Australia round the tropical north to southern Queensland, close to the coast line along beaches, in bays and estuaries, muddy rivers and creeks.

 

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King Threadfin - Polydactylus macrochir

Thu, 2010-05-06 01:38

Also known as Giant Threadfin and King Salmon, King Threadfin are silver with a blue dorsal area and white belly.  The pectoral fins are bright yellow with five thread-like long filaments located below, which are used to locate food.  The tail is forked and powerful.

King Threadfin grow to 45kgs and 1.7metres in length, but are more usual up to 10kgs. 

They have firm white flesh and are considered above average eating. 

In Australia, King Threadfin are found from the Kimberley region of Western Australia's tropical north, to Hervey Bay Queensland, living in tropical inshore waters, estuaries and tidal reaches.   They have been recorded as far south as Karratha WA. 

 

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Striped Threadfin - Polydactylus plebeius

Thu, 2010-05-06 01:41

Striped Threadfin are dusky in the dorsal area with 7 or so darker stripes along the scale rows on the side above the lateral line.  The pectoral fins are unbranched and there are five free filamentous rays. 

Striped Threadfin grow to 1.6kgs and 46cms in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

In Australia, Striped Threadfin are found from central Western Australia, around the tropical north to Brisbane Queensland, over muddy bottoms of the continental shelf, from estuaries to coastal beaches and to relatively deep waters (less than 122m). 

Exmouth  Floreat Drain

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Sombre Sweetlips - Plectorhinchus unicolor

Thu, 2010-05-06 01:44

Sombre Sweetlips vary in colour from dark grey to brown, becoming darker with age.  The pectoral and ventral fins are dark grey and the square cut tail can be a dull yellow.  The mouth and tongue are pale orange to red.  On capture, Sombre Sweetlips show a pattern of irregular pale bars across the back and sides.

Sombre Sweetlips grow to 80cms in length.

They are considered poor eating.

In Australia, Sombre Sweetlips are found around the Dampier Archipelago Western Australia and from northern Queensland to northern New South Wales. 

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Painted Sweetlips - Diagramma labiosum

Thu, 2010-05-06 01:54

Also known as Blue Bastard, Slate Sweetlips and Slatey Bream, Painted Sweetlips are uniformly silver to grey, sometimes with scattered blotches.  There are black spots on the posterior of the dorsal and caudal fin.

Very young juveniles are pale yellow with a thick black mid-lateral stripe, a black stripe along the upper back and a black stripe on the dorsal fin.  In the next stage, the horizontal bars thin, the yellow body turns silvery white and the face retains some pale yellow.  Black spots appear between the bars.  The next stage is the adult, where the fish becomes uniformly silver grey. 

Painted Sweetlips grow 6.3kgs and 1 metre in length.

They are considered poor eating.

In Australia, Painted Sweetlips are found from southern Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to southern New South Wales. 

 

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Spotted Sweetlips - Plectorinchus chaetodontoides

Thu, 2010-05-06 02:07

Also known as Many-spotted Sweetlips and Harlequin Sweetlips, Spotted Sweetlips are heavy-bodied cream fish with dark brown spots on the body, fins and tail, which may become a hexagonal shape towards the back. 

Juvenile Spotted Sweetlips are brown with large dark-edged white spots and swim with a strange movement.  As they grow, the brown colour disappears and dark brown spots develop.

Spotted Sweetlips grow to 7kgs and 60cms in length.

They are considered poor eating.

In Australia, Spotted Sweetlips are found from Coral Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north and the Great Barrier Reef Queensland, in caves and crevices of coral reefs.

 

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Crescent Sweetlips - Plectorhinchus cinctus

Thu, 2010-05-06 02:22

Also known as Three-Banded Sweetlip, Crescent Sweetlips are deep-bodied silvery grey with a white belly and three broad oblique bars on their dorsal area.  The head is steep.  The dorsal area of the body and the fins are covered with dark spots.  

Crescent Sweetlips grow to 60cms in length.

Considered poor eating locally, but outside of Australia their commercial value is high.

Crescent Sweetlips inhabit coastal reefs near rocky and coral areas, right around the Australian coastline.

Cres

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Brown Sweetlips - Plectorhinchus gibbosus

Thu, 2010-05-06 02:46

Also known as Blubber-lip Bream, Brown Sweetlips are solid bodied uniformly brownish, becoming brownish-grey in death.  The margins of the operculum and preoperculum are dark brown to black. The lips are very thick and the inside of the mouth is orange.   The caudal fin is square-cut.

Juveniles have two broad vertical bars which fade with age and mimic a dead leaf by drifting on their side.

Brown Sweetlips grow to 12kgs and 75cms in length. 

They are considered poor eating, needing to be bled, cleaned and filleted immediately. 

In Australia, Brown Sweetlips are found from central Western Australia around the tropical north, then south to Noosa Queensland.  They are found in coral reef, estuarine and inshore waters and tend to move up estuaries more than other members of the genus.

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Gold-Spotted Sweetlip - Plectorhinchus flavomaculatus

Thu, 2010-05-06 03:11

Also known as Netted Morwong (although no relation to morwong), Gold-spotted Sweetlip are greenish/grey to brown with many golden spots on the body, dorsal and anal fins and small yellow lines on the gill cover and cheeks. The tail has dark spots and is square cut and sometimes has a dusky ventral margin. The lips are large and the inside of the mouth is orange. 

Juveniles have a gold body with orange and blue facial stripes which turn into spots as the fish matures. 

Gold-Spotted Sweetlip grow to 4kgs and 60cms in length. 

They are considered poor eating and need to be bled, cleaned, skinned and filleted on capture. 

In Australia, Gold-Spotted Sweetlip are found from Geographe Bay Western Australia around the tropical north then south to southern New South Wales. 

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Manyline Sweetlips - Plectorhinchus multivittatus

Fri, 2010-05-14 00:27

Manyline Sweetlips are solid bodied golden-yellow fish with many bright blue spots forming lines in horizontal rows.  There is a single dorsal fin and all fins are yellowish.  The body is covered with ctenoid scales and the head is almost entirely scaled.  The mouth is medium size with thick lips.  The tail is emarginate.

They grow to 50cms in length.

Manyline Sweetlips are considered average eating.

In Australia, Manyline Sweetlips are found from North West Cape Western Australia, around the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland, inhabiting coral reefs.

 

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Western Foxfish - Bodianus frenchii

Fri, 2010-05-14 00:28

Western Foxfish are red/orange to red/brown with a pale chin and belly.  They have two cream spots on their back, one being a large spot under the centre of the dorsal fin and the other at the end of the dorsal fin.  There is a small black area at the beginning of the dorsal fin.They have a broad straight tail. 

Juveniles are paler with three cream patches and a black area around the base of the pectoral fin. 

Western Foxfish grow to 50cms.   A Western Foxfish of 50cms is generally considered to be around 50 years old. 

They are considered average eating. 

Western Foxfish are found from Kalbarri WA, south around to Port Lincoln South Australia. 

 

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Blackspot Pigfish - Bodianus vulpinus

Fri, 2010-05-14 00:28

Blackspot Pigfish have different colouration between male and female.  Both have a prominent blue-edged black blotch towards the centre of the dorsal fin. Male fish are more brightly coloured with a bright red head and dorsal area and sometimes there is a pale blotch below the dorsal fin near the tail, not evident in the female.    Female fish are lighter orange to brick red with narrow darker stripes and elongate reddish blotches.  The head is pointed and the narrow jaws carry moveable teeth used for crushing shellfish.  

Blackspot Pigfish grow to 2kgs and 60cms in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

Blackspot Pigfish are found on two coasts, from Shark Bay to Cape Naturaliste in Western Australia and from southern Queensland to Montague Island New South Wales.

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Black Rabbitfish - Siganus fuscescens

Fri, 2010-05-14 00:49

Black Rabbitfish, Smudgespot Spinefoot, Mottled Spinefoot and locally called Happy Moments, (named sarcastically because of the pain caused by their venomous spines) are olive green or brown in the dorsal area and silvery below and there are generally numerous pale spots over the entire body.  Adults become mottled when frightened. Juveniles have a dark spot at the rear of the gill opening which sometimes is retained by adults. The single dorsal fin is preceded by a short, partially embedded forward pointing spine and has 13 spines.  The anal fin as 7 spines and the pelvic fins have 2 spines that surround the three inner rays.

Happy Moments grow to 1.3kgs and 40cms in length.

They are rated as good eating but great care must be taken when handling because of numerous small spines with venom glands which inflict severe pain which can last for hours.

In Australia, Happy Moments are found from south-west Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to southern New South Wales.


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Rough Flutemouth - Fistularia petimba

Fri, 2010-05-14 01:18

Rough Flutemouth are reddish pink to brownish orange and have a row of elongate bony plates along the midline of the back.  They are distinguished from Smooth Flutemouth (greenish) by their colour and by the presence of the bony midline plates which are absent in the Smooth Flutemouth.

Rough Flutemouth differ from Smooth Flutemouth in colour (Smooth are greenish) and the bony midline plates are missing

Rough Flutemouth grow to 4.6kgs and 1.85 metres in length.

In Australia, Rough Flutemouth are found from south west Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to central New South Wales.

 

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Smooth Flutemouth - Fistularia commersonii

Fri, 2010-05-14 22:54

Smooth Flutemouth are very elongate greenish/grey fish with blue wavy horizontal lines or lines of blue spots.  There is a long filament lined with sensory pores for detecting prey, projecting from the tail fin. 

Smooth Flutemouth grow to 1.6 metres.

Smooth Flutemouth are found in waters around Cockburn Sound Western Australia, Northern Territory and Queensland south to Sydney New South Wales.

 

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Longfinned Pike - Dinolestes lewini

Fri, 2010-05-14 22:55

Longfinned Pike have a cylindrical body coloured yellowish-brown in the dorsal area and fading to a silver belly.  They have large eyes, a pointed snout, large mouth and a jutted lower jaw with some canine-like teeth.  The lateral line extends onto the beginning of the caudal fin, which is distinctively yellow.  They are often confused with barracouta, snook and striped seapike, the distinguishing difference being the long-based anal fin of the Longfinned Pike. 

Longfinned Pike grow to 2kgs and 90cms in length but the average length is around 50 cms.

They are considered poor eating.  They have a strong smell and are considered good bait for mulloway.

Longfinned Pike are endemic to Australia, found from Rottnest Island Western Australia, around southern waters to the central coast of New South Wales, including Tasmania, in depths up to 65m. 

Photo courtesy ANIMA

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Striped Seapike - Sphyraena obtusata

Fri, 2010-05-14 22:55

Also known as Striped Barracuda and Yellow-fin Pike, Striped Seapike are elongated streamlined silver fish with a greenish to golden/brown dorsal area fading to a silver belly.  There is a yellowish to brown stripe from the snout tip to the caudal fin base and sometimes bars are present on the upper side.  The caudal fin is dusky yellow.  The mouth and eye are large.  They are often confused with Snook, but Striped Seapike are identified by the positioning of the dorsal fins. 

Striped Seapike grow to 55cms in length. 

They are considered average eating. 

Striped Seapike are found from Albany Western Australia, north around to Queensland then south to Sydney NSW. 

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Snook - Sphyraena novaehollandiae

Fri, 2010-05-14 23:01

Also known as Short-finned Seapike, Snook are elongated, streamlined fish with a grey-green back and silver sides.  There may be two or three darker green longitudinal stripes along the side.  Along WA's coast, they can be purplish brown.  The dorsal fins are widely separated and short based, the first dorsal fin commencing well to the rear of the pectoral fin.  The ventral fins are also set behind the pectoral fin.  The first dorsal fin has 5 spines and the second dorsal has 1 spine and 9 soft rays.  They have a large mouth with a protruding bottom jaw with strong fang-like teeth.  They can be distinguished from Striped Seapike by the position of the first dorsal fin.  The fins are lightly coloured and the tail may be yellow, but never as yellow as the long-finned pike.

Snook grow to 5kgs and 1.1 metres in length.

They are considered very good eating with white, sweet flesh, although soft.  Care should be taken not to bruise the flesh and they should be cleaned immediately on capture.

Snook are found from Jurien Bay Western Australia, around the southern coast including Tasmania, then north to southern Queensland, in waters to 20m. 

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Barracouta - Thyrsites atun

Sat, 2010-05-15 00:06

Barracouta are elongated, streamlined, steely grey fish.  There is a distinctive black patch near the front of the sail-like first dorsal fin, which is very long.  A single lateral line runs close to the upper contour of the body below most of the first dorsal-fin base, then abruptly curves ventrally.  The tail is forked and black and there are around 5 finlets on the caudal peduncle.  They have a prominently protruding lower jaw with a mouth full of sharp teeth, including three large teeth in their upper jaw. 

Barracouta grow to 4.5kgs and 1.4 metres. 

They are considered poor eating, but are good smoked.  The flesh is often infested with parasitic worms, so it must be well cooked.  Extreme care should be used when handling Barracouta due to their razor sharp teeth, which also have an anticoagulant which makes cuts bleed profusely.

Barracouta are cold water fish, found in Australia from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the southern coast to Newcastle New South Wales.

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Crocodile Longtom - Tylosurus crocodilis

Sat, 2010-05-15 01:22

Crocodile Longtom are long slender fish with a dark blue back and silver-white sides.  There is a distinct keel on the caudal peduncle which distinguishes this longtom from others.   The caudal fin is deeply forked. 

Crocodile Longtom grow to 1.5 metres. 

They can be eaten but are full of small bones.

In Australia, Crocodile Longtom are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north then south to New South Wales. 

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Slender Longtom - Strongylura leiura

Sat, 2010-05-15 01:24

Slender Longtom are bluish green to pale brownish/green with a distinctive black bar on the cheek.  They have elongate jaws and a long slender shape.  There is no lateral keel on the caudal peduncle. 

Slender Longtom grow to 1 metre in length. 

They can be eaten but are full of small bones. 

In Australia, Slender Longtom are found from north west Western Australia round the tropical north to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

 

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Bartail Flathead - Platycephalus indicus

Sun, 2010-05-16 00:30

Often confused with Yellowtail Flathead (Platycephalus endrachtensis) Bartail Flathead are elongated sandy brown to grey dorsally with fine marbling and broad, darker brown cross bars.  There is a large dark blotch inside the operculum.  The sides are whitish.  Bartail Flathead are distinguished by their caudal fin which is centrally yellow with black bars on the upper and lower margins.  The dorsal, pectoral and pelvic fins have small brown spots on the rays and the anal fin is whitish.

Bartail Flathead grow to 4kgs and 1 metre in length.

They are very good eating.

In Australia, Bartail Flathead are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north to Port Hacking New South Wales.

 

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Yellowtail Flathead - Platycephalus endrachtensis

Sun, 2010-05-16 00:31

Also known as Flagtail Flathead and often confused with Bartail Flathead, Yellowtail Flathead are elongate, brown to sandy dorsally with numerous darker spots, and sometimes indistinct dark brown bands across the back.  They are distinguished by their whitish caudal fin with three to four black horizontal bars and a prominent yellow blotch on the upper margin.  (Bartail Flathead Platycephalus indicus' caudal fin is centrally yellow with black bars on the upper and lower margins.)   The Yellowtail mouth is large, reaching to mid-eye level.  The dorsal and paired fins have small brown spots on the rays, the pectoral fins are moderately small and the pelvic fins are long based below the centre of the pectoral fins.

Yellowtail Flathead grow to 1.5kgs and 47cms in length.

They are very good eating. 

Yellowtail Flathead are found from Fremantle Western Australila, around the tropical north and then south to Port Hacking New South Wales, in shallow coastal waters and estuaries. 

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Southern Bluespotted Flathead - Platycephalus speculator

Sun, 2010-05-16 00:39

Southern Bluespotted Flathead are sandy to brown with white and blue spots on their back.  There are three to five black blotches on the rear of the caudal fin and a fine white margin.

Southern Bluespotted Flathead grow to 3.2kgs and 90cms in length.

They are considered good eating.

Southern Bluespotted Flathead are endemic to Australian waters and are found from Lancelin Western Australia, round the southern coast to northern Victoria, including northern Tasmania.

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Tassel-Snouted Flathead - Thysanophrys cirronasus

Sun, 2010-05-16 00:43

Tassel-Snouted Flathead can vary in colour from pale brown to purple with a number of variable dark saddles and markings, their colours generally camouflaging with the  surroundings.  They have a very large head (approx 40% of their body size) which is depressed with several ridges with strong spines.  There is a dark band along the margin of the first short, spiny dorsal fin and all other fins have markings.  They have large eyes and a large mouth with bands on the lower jaw.  There is occasionally a bushy tentacle on the eye, which causes confusion with the Fringe-eyed Flathead.

Tassel-Snouted Flathead grow to 38cms.

They are considered good eating.

Tassel-Snouted Flathead are found from south-west Western Australia, around the southern temperate waters up to southern Queensland.  They are not in Tasmanian waters.

 

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Dusky Flathead - Platycephalus fuscus

Wed, 2010-05-26 01:07

Caught only along the East Coast, Dusky Flathead range in colour from sandy with small brown spots and dusky blotches to blackish brown with white spots, which disappear after death. Dusky Flathead can be distinguished by a spotted tail with one larger spot and a bluish area on the lower half of the caudal fin. They have sharp spines on their cheeks. 

Dusky Flathead grow to 15kgs and 1.5metres in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

Dusky Flathead are found from Mackay Queensland south to Wilson's Promontory Victoria, commonly on sandy and silty bottoms of estuaries and coastal bays.

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Fringelip Flathead - Sunagocia otaitensis

Wed, 2010-05-26 01:08

Fringelip Flathead are distinguished by a very broad and flat tan or brown head and dorsal area with white flecks or small spots.  They have 4-5 darker bands across the back and sides and a white belly.  There are two dorsal fins, the first spinous and short based and the second is moderately long based with long anterior rays.  The anal fin is longer-based than the second dorsal fin.  The pectoral, caudal and pelvic fins are mottled or spotted.  The caudal and pectoral fins are rounded.  The pelvic fin is long, below the centre of the pectoral fins and reaching beyond the start of the anal fin.  The lips are covered with rows of tiny warty papillae.

Fringelip Flathead grow to 30cms. 

In Australia, Fringelip Flathead are found from the north west shelf of Western Australia, north around tropical waters to Townsville Reef Queensland.  Demersal to depths of 40m. 

Exmouth

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Yellowspotted Triggerfish - Pseudobalistes fusces

Wed, 2010-05-26 01:31

Yellowspotted Triggerfish are heavy bodied grey to brown with a network of yellow to orange spots.  The pectoral, soft dorsal, anal and caudal fins are dark with pale white to blue margins.  The caudal fins of adult fish have pointed lobes.   There is a deep groove in front of the eyes and shallow horizontal grooves on the cheeks. 

Yellowspotted Triggerfish grow to 65cms in length. 

They are average eating. 

In Australia, Yellowspotted Triggerfish are found from Ningaloo Reef Western Australia and the north Great Barrier Reef to southern New South Wales. 

65cms

 

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Redtooth Triggerfish - Odonus niger

Wed, 2010-05-26 01:43

Redtooth Triggerfish are blue to purple often with a pale zone in the middle of the body.  The head can be pale blue to dull green.  The median fins have pale blue margins and the caudal fin is lunate with elongated lobes in adults.  There are rows of small spines on the rear sides of the body.  The upturned mouth has two long red teeth in the upper jaw and the lower jaw protrudes. 

Redtooth Triggerfish grow to 40cms in length. 

In Australia, Redtooth Triggerfish are found off north west Western Australia and the entire length of the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Picasso Triggerfish - Rhinecanthus aculeatus

Wed, 2010-05-26 02:15

Also known as Blackbar and Lagoon Triggerfish, Picasso Triggerfish can be recognised by their angular body and distinctive colouration.  The body is cream with a dark region mid-laterally.  There are four sloping white-blue stripes from the central body to the anal fin.  Four blue lines cross between the eyes and there are three blue lines between the eyes and the pectoral fin base.  A yellow line enclosing a blue 'moustache' runs between the mouth and the pectoral fin base.  There is a sharp spine or trigger which folds down into a groove, seen as the black streak on top of the fish.

They grow to 30cms in length.

Picasso Triggerfish are highly sought after for the aquarium trade but can be aggressive towards other fish.

In Australia, Picasso Triggerfish are found from central Western Australia to offshore islands off north-west Western Australia, and from the northern Great Barrier Reef Queensland south to Sydney New South Wales.  They live in reefs and sandy areas of coral reefs.

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Needlescaled Queenfish - Scomberoides tol

Wed, 2010-05-26 02:18

Also called Slender Leatherskin, Needlescaled Queenfish are silver with a blue/green dorsal area. They have between five and eight small grey oval marks along the lateral line, the first 4 to 5 making contact with the lateral line.   The front of the short, soft dorsal fin has a black tip.

They grow to 510 grams and 60cms in length. 

They are not rated as table fish. 

In Australia, Needlescaled Queenfish are found from Exmouth Western Australia north around to Rockhampton Queensland.

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Queenfish - Scomberoides commersonianus

Fri, 2010-05-28 01:19

Queenfish are large, long and laterally compressed silvery fish with a light blue or green dorsal area with a tinge of gold below.  There are between five and eight grey spots above the lateral line, although the first two may contact the lateral line.  The mouth is large and extends back beyond the eye. 

Queenfish grow to 15kgs and 1.2metres in length. 

They are average table fish.

In Australia Queenfish are found from Exmouth Western Australia, north around to Moreton Bay in southern Queensland. 

Exmouth

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Banded Archerfish - Toxotes jaculatrix

Fri, 2010-05-28 01:36

Banded Archerfish are deep bodied silver fish with broad black vertical bars on the upper back.  The dorsal fin (4 spines) is set well back, enabling the fish to lie parallel to the surface where it knocks insects from overhanging vegetation by squirting jets of water from the mouth.  They have large eyes positioned for binocular vision, and a pointed snout.

They grow to 1kg and 30cms in length.

Banded Archerfish are considered reasonable eating quality but are generally used in the aquarium trade.

Banded Archerfish are found from Derby Western Australia, round the tropical north to Innisfail northern Queensland, in brackish mangrove estuaries. 

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Long-Snouted Boarfish - Pentaceropsis recurvirostris

Fri, 2010-05-28 01:36

Long-Snouted Boarfish have a distinct compressed silvery body with three oblique dark bars, one of which runs from the nape through the eye to the snout.  They have a very small mouth set at the end of a tube like snout.  The dorsal spines are long, very strong and venomous.  The soft dorsal, anal and ventral fins have sickle-shaped extensions.

Long-Snouted Boarfish grow to 4.5kgs and 50cms in length.

They are considered very good eating.  The dorsal spines are venomous, causing extreme pain.

Long-Snouted Boarfish are endemic to Australia and found from Rottnest Island Western Australia around the southern coast to Botany Bay New South Wales, including Tasmania.  They occur in very shallow rocky reefs and down to depths of 260m.

 

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Brown-spotted Boarfish - Paristiopterus gallipavo

Sun, 2010-05-30 01:33

Also known as Yellowspotted Boarfish, Brown-spotted Boarfish are deep bodied silver-grey fish covered with distinctive patterning of brown blotches and yellow to brown spots.  They have four extremely long dorsal spines. 

Brown-spotted Boarfish grow to 90cms. 

They are considered very good eating, with firm flesh.  Avoid touching the venomous dorsal spines at all costs.

Brown-spotted Boarfish are endemic to Australia and are found from Perth Western Australia, south around to South Australia, Victoria and southern New South Wales.  They are a benthic species found in temperate continental shelf waters.

 

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Giant Boarfish - Paristiopterus labiosus

Sun, 2010-05-30 01:33

Giant Boarfish are dull reddish brown with darker brown irregular areas.  As they mature, the oblique stripes of the juveniles fade.  They have a pig like snout with a large mouth. 

Juveniles are silvery white with irregular oblique dark markings on the sides.  The head and fins are dark grey.  They have long dorsal fin spines which become proportionally shorter as the fish grows. 

Giant Boarfish grow to 12kg and 1 metre in length. 

They are considered very good eating.

In Australia Giant Boarfish are found from Perth Western Australia, around the southern coast to New South Wales, including Tasmania. 

 

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Darwin Jawfish - Opistognathus darwiniensis

Sun, 2010-05-30 01:33

Darwin Jawfish are distinguished by the yellowish colour of their fins, dense spotting on their head and sides and prominent banding on dorsal, anal and tail fins.  There is a distinctive black blotch on the front dorsal area.  Jawfish are mouthbrooders, meaning that their eggs are hatched in their mouths where the newborn fry are protected from predators. 

Darwin Jawfish grow to 50cms. 

In Australia, Darwin Jawfish are found from Ningaloo Reef Western Australia around the tropical north to southern Queensland, in shallow reefs.  They live in vertical burrows in the sand.

Exmouth

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Blotched Jawfish - Opistognathus latitabundus

Sun, 2010-05-30 01:33

Blotched Jawfish are brown with large, spaced dark blotches on the base of the dorsal fin and their sides.  They have a very large mouth with numerous small sharp teeth. 

Blotched Jawfish grow to 30cms. 

Blotched Jawfish are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north to the Gulf of Carpentaria Queensland. 

 

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

John Dory - Zeus faber

Sun, 2010-05-30 02:02

John Dory are a deep oval shape, almost flat with a large head and big eyes.   They are olive, brown and/or cream with a large black spot circled by cream on their sides.  The first dorsal and pelvic fins are long and there are long filaments between the spines of the dorsal fin which may reach back past its tail. There may be dark stripes along the body when caught. 

John Dory grow to  8kgs and 75cms. 

They are excellent eating, having firm white flesh. 

John Dory are found from Port Hedland WA, south around the southern coast including Tasmania and then north to Queensland. 

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Yellowtail Trumpeter - Amniataba caudovittata

Mon, 2010-05-31 02:24

Also known as Yellowtail Grunter, Yellowtail Trumpeter have an upper grey body covered with darker spots and a paler belly.  Some have 5 or 6 incomplete vertical bars extending from beneath the dorsal fin.  The fins are yellow and the caudal fin is yellow with stripes and spots and two distinctive black bars on each lobe of the tail.  The body is quite deep and the upper jaw is slightly longer than the lower jaw. 

Yellowtail Trumpeter grow to 28cms. 

They are not considered good eating. 

Yellowtail Trumpeter are found from Cape Leeuwin WA, north around to Bowen Queensland. 

 

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Sea Trumpeter - Pelsartia humeralis

Mon, 2010-05-31 02:24

Sea Trumpeter have a yellowish/green back with a silvery belly.  There are dark vertical blotches on the sides, with spots on the dorsal area, upper head and all fins.

Juveniles are more reddish brown in colour. 

Sea Trumpeter grow to 38cms. 

They are considered poor eating. 

Endemic to Australia, Sea Trumpeter are found from the Abrolhos Islands Western Australia south around to western South Australia, in coastal bays and protected offshore areas. 

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Striped Trumpeter - Terapontidae - undifferentiated

Mon, 2010-05-31 02:24

Also known as Striped Perch, Striped Trumpeter vary from silver to yellowish brown.  The tail is spotted.  A dark blotch on the back behind the head and indications of dark cross-bands are often present after capture.  They are often confused with Trumpeter (latris lineata), but the Striped Trumpeter has a much shorter head and more wavy lines along the nape. 

Striped Trumpeter grow to 32cms. 

They are generally considered poor eating and are commonly used as bait fish.  Care should be taken with spikes near the gills.

Striped Trumpeter are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, south to Kangaroo Island South Australia. 

 

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Sergeant Baker - Aulopus purpurissatus

Mon, 2010-05-31 02:24

Sergeant Baker have a long tapering body with reddish to purple blotched colouration.  The second dorsal fin is very small.  Males have an elongated filament at the front of the first dorsal fin.  The caudal fin is forked and the pectoral fins are large.  They have a large mouth. 

Sergeant Baker grow to 3kgs and 70cms in length. 

They are average eating. 

Sergeant Baker are endemic to Australia, found from central Western Australia south around the southern coast to southern Queensland, and including Tasmania. 

Male

 

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Gobbleguts - Apogon rueppellii

Tue, 2010-06-01 02:45

Adult Gobbleguts have a translucent brown body and a series of black spots along the lateral line.  They have two separate dorsal fins.

Gobbleguts grow to 40 grams and 12cms in length.

They are abundant and are found from Albany Western Australia, north around the Northern Territory and to southern Queensland, in weedy areas in inshore reefs and estuaries.

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Western Scalyfin - Parma occidentalis

Tue, 2010-06-01 02:45

Western Scalyfin are greyish brown to black.  Often white bars are seen as the fish matures from juvenile stage.  The distinguishing feature from McCulloch's Scalyfin is the concave profile of the adult snout. 

Juvenile Western Scalyfin have white vertical bars.

They grow to 30cms in length.

Western Scalyfin are endemic to Western Australia, found from Cape Leeuwin to Coral Bay.

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

McCulloch's Scalyfin - Parma mccullochi

Tue, 2010-06-01 02:45

McCulloch's Scalyfin (Damselfish) may be dark grey, brown or olive green, the head often darker than the body.  They have a single long dorsal fin and a forked tail.  McCulloch's scalyfin have a more rounded head than Western Scalyfin and there are no visible white lines. 

McCulloch's Scalyfin grow to 30cms. 

They are found in southern Western Australia from the Recherche Archipelago to the Abroholos. 

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Redbelly Yellowtail Fusilier - Caesio cuning

Tue, 2010-06-01 03:04

Redbelly Yellowtail Fusilier are deep bodied and greyish-blue with a silver to pink belly which becomes red on death.  The pectoral, pelvic and anal fins are white to pink.  The dorsal fin is greyish blue at the front and yellow towards the back.  The large tail is yellow.   They have large eyes and a short snout. 

Redbelly Yellowtail Fusilier grow to 60cms in length. 

They are considered reasonable eating. 

In Australia, Redbelly Yellowtail Fusilier are found from north west Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to central New South Wales, inhabiting offshore reef slopes in depths to 60m.


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Fusilier - Paracaesio and Caesio

Tue, 2010-06-01 03:09

Paracaesio xanthura (formerly pedleyi) are commonly known as Southern Fusilier, Yellowtail Blue Snapper, Yellowtail Fusilier and Yellowtail False Fusilier (and in Qld False Fusilier) and belong to Lutjanidae (Snapper).  They are blue overall, sometimes with a white belly and lower part of the head.  There is a broad bright yellow stripe on the upper back extending from the forehead to the base of the caudal fin.  The dorsal and caudal fins are yellowish and the other fins are whitish or translucent.  The eye is large and the snout is short.  The pectoral fins are long, reaching the level of the anus.   They grow to 50cms in length and are found from Geographe Bay Western Australia, around the tropical north, then south to northern New South Wales, in reefy waters from 5-150 metres.

Paracaesio sordida (also Lutjanidae) are commonly known as False Fusilier and are purplish brown to bluish, with silver to white on the lower sides and belly, and the dorsal and lower lobe of the tail is red (or dark brown underwater).  The other fins are white to translucent.  Juveniles have a yellow to orange caudal fin.  The eye is large and the snout is short.  The upper and lower jaws are roughly equal.  They grow to 48cms and are found from Lancelin Western Australia, around the tropical north to southern Queensland, in reefy areas 5-200 metres. 

Caesio xanthonota are commonly known as Yellowback Fusilier and Blue and Yellow Fusilier and are bright yellow on the upper third of their body and caudal fin, the middle third is blue and the lower third is white.  They have a distinguishing black spot on the pectoral fin base.  They grow to 40cms and are found in Australia only in the far north of Western Australia, around coral reefs in 0-50 metres.  

Caesio teres are commonly known as Yellow and Blueback Fusilier and have a bright yellow upper back, tail and posterior region of the dorsal fin.  The rest of the body is bright blue above and silvery white below.  The pectoral, pelvic and anal fins are white, while the upper base of the pectoral fin is black.   They grow to 40cms.   They are reef associated and found in waters from 5-50 metres.   They are found from Lancelin Western Australia around the tropical north to southern Queensland. 

They are all considered good eating.                                                     

Paracaesio

Paracaesio sordida juvenile

 

 

 

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Blotched Flounder - Asterorhombus intermedius

Tue, 2010-06-01 15:44

Also known as Intermediate Flounder, Blotched Flounder are identified by dense scattering of dark speckles and blotches on the fins and body.  They have a nearly continuous bony ridge extending from the anterior margin of the lower eye to the posterior margin of the upper eye.

Blotched Flounder grow to 20cms. 

They are good eating. 

Blotched Flounder are found from north west Western Australia around the tropical north and south to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland, inhabiting sand and muddy bottoms.

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Largetooth Flounder - Pseudorhombus arsius

Wed, 2010-06-02 02:13

Largetooth Flounder vary in colour according to their habitat ie a form of camouflage.  They have two distinct inline dark spots on their body.  There are several prominent teeth at the front of the mouth.  The tail comes to a point. 

Largetooth Flounder grow to 1kg and 50cms in length. 

They are considered good eating. 

They are found all around the Australian coast with the exception of Victoria and Tasmania. 

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Bigtooth Twinspot Flounder - Pseudorhombus diplospilus

Wed, 2010-06-02 02:17

Also known as Four Twinspot Flounder, Bigtooth Twinspot Flounder are easily identified by four distinct pairs of 'eye spots'.  They are often confused with Ocellated Flounder (Pseudorhombus dupliocellatus) which have the same eye spot pattern but lack the enlarged canine teeth of the Bigtooth Twinspot Flounder.   They vary from pale to dark brown depending on habitat.   The tail forms a point. 

Bigtooth Twinspot Flounder grow to 40cms. 

They are good eating. 

Bigtooth Twinspot Flounder are found from north west Western Australia north around the tropical coast to the Great Barrier Reef Queensland. 

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Date Joined: 03/05/06

Smalltooth Flounder - Pseudorhombus jenynsii

Wed, 2010-06-02 02:19

Smalltooth Flounder are left eyed flounder and similar to Largetooth Flounder but do not have large teeth in the jaws.  Their colour varies from pale yellowish to dark brown, with five or six prominent eye spots on the body which are a collection of small brown spots surrounded by white. 

Smalltooth Flounder grow to 40cms in length. 

They are good eating. 

They are generally a cooler water species but found from Exmouth WA, south around to Central Queensland, but rarely Tasmania.