Newbie fish ID pls!

 My son (9yo) and I are newbies to fishing! We are in Carnarvon at the moment and caught this fella down at the fascine but threw him back because we didn't know what it was. I'm thinking an emperor of some sort due to the shape? I could be way off track, and the fisheries book that we have just doesn't seem to have it. It was just shy of 30cm. I'm sure one of the pros here will know!

cheers,

jess

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Date Joined: 08/05/10

Blueline Emp. Min size 32cm

Wed, 2015-06-03 16:04

Blueline Emp.

Min size 32cm so you were right to throw back.

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Date Joined: 22/08/12

Pity was undersize they taste as good as they

Wed, 2015-06-03 16:25

look

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Date Joined: 28/05/15

 Thanks for the responses!

Wed, 2015-06-03 20:24

 Thanks for the responses! Glad to know it was undersized, although I definitely wasn't going to take it without knowing what it was!  Hopefully we can catch a decent sized one soon. Although the 9yo and I don't eat fish! Luckily hubby enjoys his fish. 

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Fishwreckapedia says

Wed, 2015-06-03 23:00

 
Blue Lined Emperor - Lethrinus laticaudis
 

Officially known as Grass Emperor, and in Western Australia as Black Snapper and Blue Lined Emperor, these fish are tan, brown or yellow with scattered irregular blotches which sometimes form indistinct bands across the body.  When caught these brown blotches become more distinct.  There are speckled white spots on the cheeks and diagnostic short blue lines radiating in front of and behind the eye.  These lines do not extend right down the cheek like the spangled emperor.  Sometimes a number of blue lines cross the forehead connecting the eyes.  The fins are pale or yellow with mottling and the caudal fin is pinkish-red in colour. 

Blue Lined Emperor grow to 5kgs and 60cms. 

They are considered very good eating. 

In Australia, Blue Lined Emperor are found from Shark Bay Western Australia, north around tropical waters to southern Queensland, over coral reefs.